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Macchiato
Junior Member
(03-20-2017, 04:11 PM)
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Yo!

So I don't know how forthcoming I should be but oh well.

I work for a very well known AAA studio in a production role. Generally I work under 40 hours per week unless it's crunch time, but even then we get paid overtime. The pay is okay, but I'm still young and not senior at all so it's fine.

In general though it's a lot of fun, I'm around video games and fun people and events and what not. I think the only other industry I'd want to work for is the fashion industry, but other than that I 100% recommend it if you like video games.

You could definitely try getting into Community management? It's a fun job and you learn a lot of skills useful for other roles. Obviously certain fanbases can be toxic, but in general I'd say it's a good way to dip your toes in the industry.
Fou-Lu
Member
(03-20-2017, 04:37 PM)
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I feel you OP. I love programming, writing, and game design and I love video games. Problem is my academic education is in Physics so I can't just apply for jobs in the industry right now. I'm in grad school and trying to use my free time to improve my programming and game design skills and to build some kind of portfolio. The regrets of not just doing a comp sci degree. Yet, despite all that I am terrified of the idea of getting a game dev job and then feeling crushed by it. The dream is to eventually open my own studio so I can make the games I want, but at this point I am in debt and haven't worked a single professional year in my life.

Streaming and talking about games for a living would be great, but I don't think I have enough personality for it. If you do, I would say go for it! Or at least give it a try.
keraj37
Member
(03-20-2017, 04:58 PM)
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Originally Posted by Fou-Lu

I feel you OP. I love programming, writing, and game design and I love video games. Problem is my academic education is in Physics so I can't just apply for jobs in the industry right now. I'm in grad school and trying to use my free time to improve my programming and game design skills and to build some kind of portfolio. The regrets of not just doing a comp sci degree. Yet, despite all that I am terrified of the idea of getting a game dev job and then feeling crushed by it. The dream is to eventually open my own studio so I can make the games I want, but at this point I am in debt and haven't worked a single professional year in my life.

Streaming and talking about games for a living would be great, but I don't think I have enough personality for it. If you do, I would say go for it! Or at least give it a try.

Hmmm, I have semi PhD in theology, and I work as programmer in game industry around 10 years. Your physics degree is much more accurate for this role.

I am not sure how it looks in US/Canada but here in Europe mostly nobody cares about your education unless you have no experience or portfolio.
zephervack
Member
(03-20-2017, 05:05 PM)
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Originally Posted by Two Words

I can't imagine being a programmer on a video game would be paying badly. Software development jobs typically pay well, so I don't see how they can keep programmers if they aren't competitive with pay.

Not as much as you imagine once you factor in crunch and realize how much it is per hour when working 60+ hour weeks.

Sometimes it gets real close to minimum wage, specially in places like Canada with insane income tax.
keraj37
Member
(03-20-2017, 05:08 PM)
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Originally Posted by zephervack

Not as much as you imagine once you factor in crunch and realize how much it is per hour when working 60+ hour weeks.

Sometimes it gets real close to minimum wage, specially in places like Canada with insane income tax.

So then usually good programmers leave the job and look for REALLY well paid/with normalized hours jobs. So the comment you quote is actually right and you prove it to.
Kayero
Member
(03-20-2017, 05:10 PM)
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Originally Posted by Macchiato

Yo!

So I don't know how forthcoming I should be but oh well.

I work for a very well known AAA studio in a production role. Generally I work under 40 hours per week unless it's crunch time, but even then we get paid overtime. The pay is okay, but I'm still young and not senior at all so it's fine.



Congrats, sounds like you hit the jackpot.
Robert at Zeboyd Games
Zeboyd Games
(03-20-2017, 05:13 PM)
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I have a friend at Nintendo (in one of the divisions associated with Treehouse) who seems to like his job. He made it clear that he wanted to spend time with him family and didn't want to work overtime so he hasn't progressed through the ranks as quickly as he might have if he was a workaholic, but he makes decent money & it's stable work (he's been there for several years).
Reedirect
Member
(03-20-2017, 05:14 PM)
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Originally Posted by Macchiato

You could definitely try getting into Community management? It's a fun job and you learn a lot of skills useful for other roles. Obviously certain fanbases can be toxic, but in general I'd say it's a good way to dip your toes in the industry.

This. There are a few nasty communities out there, we know the ones, but I'd say those are exceptions in the big picture.
heckmanimation
Member
(03-20-2017, 05:16 PM)
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freelance vfx animator here, having done some game work and seeing how the industries overlap significantly....avoid these industries unless you dont want a family, are a savant, or yeah that's all I got.
Peltz
Member
(03-20-2017, 05:25 PM)
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Originally Posted by Fhtagn

This can take a long time to figure out, took me till my late 20s actually, but it's better to do what one loves when it's the verb you love and not the subject.

I love music but I got advice from a friend who was deep in the industry to stay out of it. I eventually found a job I really like where my personality and the tasks at hand align really well even if the subject/focus of the work is mostly boring.

So for example, if you enjoy video editing, there's tons of videos that need editing, they don't have to be about video games. It's the verb that matters more.

(And when the thing you love becomes your job instead of a verb you love, the circumstances of your work can badly affect your enthusiasm for the thing you once loved.)

This is very solid and insightful advice.
Gai Murakumo
Member
(03-20-2017, 05:28 PM)
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I would say unless it is around the fringe of video game developing such as marketing, accounting etc., I would expect most positions to be quite grueling and taxing on an individual especially during crunch time. Personally myself "yes" I would love to work for the video game industry because of my love of games, but in reality I still love what I am doing now and can enjoy games still because I am not feeling pressured in my job.
13ruce
Member
(03-20-2017, 05:30 PM)
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Honestly even other very good paying jobs are very time consuming unless it's a 9 to 5 job or something simular to that.

I always wanted to do something with video games but dev development or coding with ADHD is not gonna work coding for 8+ hours straight would bore me and probably make me very unhappy.

Now i am going for IT (security and maintenance part) and Bussiness and Management (or dentist but i will decide between that and bussiness after the it education i need that one for higher education first or be 25 for the universety test currently 22 but i rather wanna get a diploma/paper in the maintime to have a broader profile for more available jobs later after i am done with school). I like technology and computers but not the heavy coding part. And i like being a leader so that other one is for becoming a manager or do something management related in a company or do analyzing for companies and more.

Good Luck op if you really want to do something in video gsmes i hope you find a perfect job in it! For me i like my free time so i prefer a 9 to 5 job (40-50 hour workweek). Freelance stuff would be your best bet or multiple part time jobs videogame related.
Shredderi
Member
(03-20-2017, 05:35 PM)
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Could never see myself working in a big AAA-company just because I'm already disillusioned by the whole thing. I still want to work on games but not on that scale. Indie is where my passion would be, not because of it being easier (it certainly would not be) but because of personal agency. If it's just me and 2 friends then you can imagine how different it would be even if you worked yourself to the bone.
SomTervo
Member
(03-20-2017, 05:41 PM)
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Nowadays, in my experience, you have to build your career before you have a career. The market is saturated and there aren't enough opportunities.

Find out what you physically like doing day after day, then work on several projects FOR FREE and give it your all, then try going for jobs.

This worked for me.
excaliburps
Member
(03-20-2017, 06:03 PM)
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It's not an easy field to get into (especially games media).

I would say the best job is to be a CEO or Director of a studio, but eh, that's kinda hard, no? :)

Being serious here, I've been working in games media for (I think) eight years now; mostly full-time. Worked my way up from being a news writer/reviewer to being the Editor-in-Chief of a fairly big site (http://www.playstationlifestyle.net/), that's owned by a corporation.

Pros: You work from home, you know a fair bit more news and stuff before it happens, you get free games, and it's fun (well, mostly).

Cons: Pay is iffy sometimes until you climb up in rank, everyone thinks you have an easy job (it's not), people hate you for reviews and think you're corrupt, you get tired from having to sometimes rush through games to make embargo, not having enough time to actually play the games you want to play.

If you have any questions, feel free to post them here or send me a PM and I'll be glad to help.

FYI: Games journalism pays like crap most of the time, and it's super normal to be paid "per project." Once you've proven you're solid enough of a worker, there's going to be a flat rate or salary along the way and so on. There are a ton of sites that want to capitalize on the "omG Free gaemz!" thing by offering you games in exchange for work. Personally, I don't approve of that unless you're perfecting your craft and know you need an editor to guide you.

But once you're good enough, definitely apply for paid work.
Last edited by excaliburps; 03-20-2017 at 06:06 PM.
SOLDIER
Member
(03-21-2017, 01:02 AM)
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Originally Posted by 13ruce

Honestly even other very good paying jobs are very time consuming unless it's a 9 to 5 job or something simular to that.

I always wanted to do something with video games but dev development or coding with ADHD is not gonna work coding for 8+ hours straight would bore me and probably make me very unhappy.

Now i am going for IT (security and maintenance part) and Bussiness and Management (or dentist but i will decide between that and bussiness after the it education i need that one for higher education first or be 25 for the universety test currently 22 but i rather wanna get a diploma/paper in the maintime to have a broader profile for more available jobs later after i am done with school). I like technology and computers but not the heavy coding part. And i like being a leader so that other one is for becoming a manager or do something management related in a company or do analyzing for companies and more.

Good Luck op if you really want to do something in video gsmes i hope you find a perfect job in it! For me i like my free time so i prefer a 9 to 5 job (40-50 hour workweek). Freelance stuff would be your best bet or multiple part time jobs videogame related.

The IT field is something that people constantly suggest I major in. I've got a friend who is on his last year to be a Network Administrator.

Unfortunately "IT" is such a broad term, and my indeciciveness keeps me from looking into it further. Like you said, I don't want to invest in a career where my final endpoint would have me doing something monotonous and boring (I'm already doing that in my current job). I just wish I knew a good resource that could give me the details of each career and the roadmap needed to reach that point.

That's a bit off-topic, but it is one of the three fields I've been pondering about working in (videogames, IT, writing). If you've got info on the other two, I'd appreciate a PM.
Septimus Prime
Member
(03-21-2017, 01:19 AM)
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Originally Posted by SOLDIER

The IT field is something that people constantly suggest I major in. I've got a friend who is on his last year to be a Network Administrator.

Unfortunately "IT" is such a broad term, and my indeciciveness keeps me from looking into it further. Like you said, I don't want to invest in a career where my final endpoint would have me doing something monotonous and boring (I'm already doing that in my current job). I just wish I knew a good resource that could give me the details of each career and the roadmap needed to reach that point.

That's a bit off-topic, but it is one of the three fields I've been pondering about working in (videogames, IT, writing). If you've got info on the other two, I'd appreciate a PM.

Every company needs IT—even (especially, actually) video game companies.
chun li's thighs
Member
(03-21-2017, 01:23 AM)
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It's not a real common role, but I've known a couple of companies that had something called a Product Specialist or something to that effect. It's kind of a superfluous role and appears when a company has both an intersection of a very full line up and marketers that prefer to stay behind the scenes and are spread thin.

The role is essentially a support role for marketing and PR and basically requires someone to be extremely familiar with all the games they're putting out and be able to evangelize/explain the game both internally and externally. Perks are that it's your job to be familiar with the companies games and you get to travel to various event to be the person to help promote them at shows, sales meetings, TV, etc. Also, no real deliverables, KPI's, or any accountability. The main downside is that it's a fairly low skill, low ambition role so it doesn't pay the greatest and has a low ceiling. It can also be cut pretty quickly in the event of downsizing.

It's particularly needed at US publishers of foreign (i.e. Japanese) games with limited access to the dev teams. I did this as a subset of my main job for a while when I was new to the industry. I was a valuable tool internally for our Marketing team because they simply didn't have enough time to know everything about a games features and probably couldn't demo or speak about a game with any real passion. It was fun to do for a while and I got to go to a lot of places for basically free, but it's a dead end job.
Last edited by chun li's thighs; 03-21-2017 at 01:26 AM.
Fou-Lu
Member
(03-21-2017, 01:59 AM)
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Originally Posted by keraj37

Hmmm, I have semi PhD in theology, and I work as programmer in game industry around 10 years. Your physics degree is much more accurate for this role.

I am not sure how it looks in US/Canada but here in Europe mostly nobody cares about your education unless you have no experience or portfolio.

Which is why I also said I am trying to build a portfolio and strengthen my skills. I wish big game studios had more jobs for training newbies instead of this pre-job experience needed place we are in.
Septimus Prime
Member
(03-21-2017, 02:02 AM)
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Originally Posted by chun li's thighs

It's not a real common role, but I've known a couple of companies that had something called a Product Specialist or something to that effect. It's kind of a superfluous role and appears when a company has both an intersection of a very full line up and marketers that prefer to stay behind the scenes and are spread thin.

The role is essentially a support role for marketing and PR and basically requires someone to be extremely familiar with all the games they're putting out and be able to evangelize/explain the game both internally and externally. Perks are that it's your job to be familiar with the companies games and you get to travel to various event to be the person to help promote them at shows, sales meetings, TV, etc. Also, no real deliverables, KPI's, or any accountability. The main downside is that it's a fairly low skill, low ambition role so it doesn't pay the greatest and has a low ceiling. It can also be cut pretty quickly in the event of downsizing.

It's particularly needed at US publishers of foreign (i.e. Japanese) games with limited access to the dev teams. I did this as a subset of my main job for a while when I was new to the industry. I was a valuable tool internally for our Marketing team because they simply didn't have enough time to know everything about a games features and probably couldn't demo or speak about a game with any real passion. It was fun to do for a while and I got to go to a lot of places for basically free, but it's a dead end job.

Aren't those positions usually outsourced to PR firms? That's not necessarily a bad thing, though, since they can just send you to work for a different publisher or developer once your current project ends to minimize downtime.
poodaddy
Member
(03-21-2017, 02:10 AM)
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Originally Posted by SOLDIER

I actually do have additional experience writing a (mostly) gaming blog and a gaming podcast (I can link both via PM on request). I also edited together a few videos during a brief stint as a video content editor for a failed website.

I enjoyed all those different types of media coverage, and I would like to try making more videos as well. In the end, I'm motivated by money, which is why I'm trying to narrow down the types of fields I should consider going into for the best possible job within my skill set.



I had a work at home seasonal job with Amazon customer service.

The customer service part was awful, but being in my pajamas while watching TV made up for it. And I was always on time, focused on the job when needed, etc.

I would especially love being able to avoid commuting, especially because Miami is a hellish Mad Max-esque experience whenever I'm on the expressway.

I'm a disabled vet and honestly I've been looking for ANY type of job like this. My background is HR as a soldier and bookkeeping as a civilian and I've got a degree in exercise science, so my resume isn't bad but I just can't seem to find stay at home jobs so I'd be happy taking vastly less money than I know I'm worth just doing something like that. How'd you get into that racket OP? If that's not too personal at least. I know you started this thread to ask for help getting into an industry so sorry that I'm taking your thread as an opportunity to ask you a question instead of answer it, but I figure this could be my only chance :/.

In an attempt to offer some anecdotal information on your question OP, so I don't come off as a selfish dick for answering your question with a question, I have a friend from high school who works as a concept artist for an independent studio and he got his start due to his portfolio. He never went to college after school like a lot of us did, but back in the day he would always just sit around and draw and write his own weird little comics in class, and I must admit they were usually pretty irreverent and funny. A bit off beat for sure, but kind of funny. Strange as it is, he traveled around the country for a bit on something he called a "walk" and continued writing and drawing his goofy little comics, even getting into political territory on occasion, and he continued to improve over the years. When he was 25 and unemployed he just submitted a portfolio of his best work to said developer and apparently he got hired on pretty easily. He had to relocate from Tennessee where we grew up, but now he lives in Seattle, where ironically I ended up moving to as well due to being near here when I got out of the Army. Life's funny like that. I don't know if that little story was helpful at all, and I realize that hiring for an art team may be different than hiring on writers, but I hope that something can be garnered from that. Good luck man.
Mihos
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(03-21-2017, 02:19 AM)
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I have been hiring engineers and programmers for over 20 years, and one part you are right in on point.... We really don't care where, how long, or even gpa you had when you went to school unless you have no experience at all that we can reference. I have had doctorates wash out in under a month and I still have veterans with less than 1 year (outside of AIT) training working for me. The only thing the degree does is qualify you for an interview when you may have been filtered out before it reached my desk. 90%+ (being generous) of the top level 100k + salary positions are obtained via headhunting or other methods. If you are new and want to get past that phase, you need to be 2 things. Honest with yourself on your own skill level (the hardest part), and willing to work under your weight class for a year or two to prove yourself. Maybe 1 in 20 people are special, no matter what you were taught, so be ready to prove yourself. And trust me, if you are half as talented in your field as you imagine, you will not only be retained... but will be fought over. I have won and lost that battle over talent again and again.

My biggest advice to people considering college paths and specifically to loan officers... don't give 50k student loans to a student majoring in a 6 year art degree when the average return on investment is a 45k a year job. Yes, you can still get that 4- 6 year degree, but plan on it taking 10 years and work your way through it if it is your absolute passion. And expect an overcrowded field where you are replaceable by a phone call. I absolutely hate what higher education has become, a business. I would hire an apprenticeship candidate 100 times over the time wasted on people who bought degrees.
SOLDIER
Member
(03-21-2017, 01:34 PM)
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Originally Posted by poodaddy

I'm a disabled vet and honestly I've been looking for ANY type of job like this. My background is HR as a soldier and bookkeeping as a civilian and I've got a degree in exercise science, so my resume isn't bad but I just can't seem to find stay at home jobs so I'd be happy taking vastly less money than I know I'm worth just doing something like that. How'd you get into that racket OP? If that's not too personal at least. I know you started this thread to ask for help getting into an industry so sorry that I'm taking your thread as an opportunity to ask you a question instead of answer it, but I figure this could be my only chance :/.

In an attempt to offer some anecdotal information on your question OP, so I don't come off as a selfish dick for answering your question with a question, I have a friend from high school who works as a concept artist for an independent studio and he got his start due to his portfolio. He never went to college after school like a lot of us did, but back in the day he would always just sit around and draw and write his own weird little comics in class, and I must admit they were usually pretty irreverent and funny. A bit off beat for sure, but kind of funny. Strange as it is, he traveled around the country for a bit on something he called a "walk" and continued writing and drawing his goofy little comics, even getting into political territory on occasion, and he continued to improve over the years. When he was 25 and unemployed he just submitted a portfolio of his best work to said developer and apparently he got hired on pretty easily. He had to relocate from Tennessee where we grew up, but now he lives in Seattle, where ironically I ended up moving to as well due to being near here when I got out of the Army. Life's funny like that. I don't know if that little story was helpful at all, and I realize that hiring for an art team may be different than hiring on writers, but I hope that something can be garnered from that. Good luck man.

I got the job through Amazon's employment page. Perhaps you could keep an eye there, especially during seasonal hire.

Just hope you're ready to put up with really dumb/ignorant customers who will routinely ask you what Amazon Prime is and why you're scamming them. I still get a good laugh out of folks when I mention the story of one Dr (at least that's what it said on his profile) who was furious that his order arrived late by 30 minutes, demanding that his entire order's bill be waived and that his future order would also be free. Called me human garbage when I denied his demand.

Customer service is awful and I'll be happy to never have to do it again, is what I'm getting at.
kitsuneyo
Member
(03-21-2017, 01:39 PM)
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Marketing. Very nice work.
chun li's thighs
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(03-21-2017, 06:26 PM)
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Originally Posted by Septimus Prime

Aren't those positions usually outsourced to PR firms? That's not necessarily a bad thing, though, since they can just send you to work for a different publisher or developer once your current project ends to minimize downtime.

Not that I know of. My job and one other guy that I know did it somewhere else were all in house.

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