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Eien1no1Yami
Junior Member
(04-27-2017, 02:45 PM)
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Ok, gaf I'm studying for JLPT N4 and in the last lesson we learnt about ーさせる
After every lesson my sensei gives me as homework to write some sentences in japanese having as context whatever we learnt in the latest lesson.
So I made this sentence and I want you to correct me if I have any errors.Also even though it may me grammatically ok, can a japanese person understand clearly what i want to say?

My sentence: 雪子先生の試験は辛いですが、いろいろに習ってさせます。

What I want to say is: Teacher Yukiko's exams are painful but it makes you learn a lot
TheSporkWithin
Member
(05-01-2017, 02:39 AM)
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Originally Posted by Eien1no1Yami


My sentence: 雪子先生の試験は辛いですが、いろいろに習ってさせます。

What I want to say is: Teacher Yukiko's exams are painful but it makes you learn a lot

You can't attach させる to て form like that. It's its own conjugation for non-する verbs. In this case it would be 習わせる. I'm not really sure, but this still strikes me as really strange with that correction. At least with this verb, I think it would have more of the meaning of forcing someone to learn some particular thing (somewhat against their will), like この会社には海外の出張が結構あるので、社員は英語を習わせます。 Because this company has frequent business trips abroad, employees are made to learn English.
Last edited by TheSporkWithin; 05-01-2017 at 02:46 AM.
Kevtones
Member
(05-01-2017, 02:42 AM)
Hi Everyone... American meeting his Japanese GF's parents this Wednesday. They don't speak a lot of English and I don't speak much Japenese... any advice? Tips?

Thank you 🙏
TheSporkWithin
Member
(05-01-2017, 02:48 AM)
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Originally Posted by Kevtones

Hi Everyone... American meeting his Japanese GF's parents this Wednesday. They don't speak a lot of English and I don't speak much Japenese... any advice? Tips?

Thank you 🙏

Try to keep things simple. Don't bite off more than you can chew and put your foot in your mouth. What do you mean by "not much Japanese"?
Aizo
音楽オタク
(05-01-2017, 09:23 AM)
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Originally Posted by Kevtones

Hi Everyone... American meeting his Japanese GF's parents this Wednesday. They don't speak a lot of English and I don't speak much Japenese... any advice? Tips?

Thank you 🙏

So you live in Japan then, I'm assuming? If you understand cultural norms from living in Japan, you should be fine. Be polite. I'm just giving you general advice, because I don't really date J girls.
Beckx
Member
(05-12-2017, 03:10 PM)
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So it turns out that some Japanese publishers are offering their Japanese language ebooks on Amazon.com. I bought Otsuichi's Car of the Dead kindle single and it turns out that after downloading it, I now have Shogakukan's J-E dictionary on my kindle. It's not as great as all of the dictionaries you get with a Japanese kindle but it's still pretty neat.

The funny thing is that the first sentence is "蝿は飛んでいる" and the dictionary doesn't have 蝿.

Anyway, it's nice because of the easy look up, no need to use a separate device to look up words.
Kilrogg
paid requisite penance
(05-12-2017, 03:23 PM)
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Originally Posted by Beckx

So it turns out that some Japanese publishers are offering their Japanese language ebooks on Amazon.com. I bought Otsuichi's Car of the Dead kindle single and it turns out that after downloading it, I now have Shogakukan's J-E dictionary on my kindle. It's not as great as all of the dictionaries you get with a Japanese kindle but it's still pretty neat.

The funny thing is that the first sentence is "蝿は飛んでいる" and the dictionary doesn't have 蝿.

Anyway, it's nice because of the easy look up, no need to use a separate device to look up words.

You don't need to buy a Japanese ebook to get the dictionary. Granted, it's kinda hard to find (I can't remember how to find it off the top of my head), but the option to download it as a standalone dictionary for free, as well the Daijisen, is there. There's also an open-source dictionary you can get via your browser and then import to your Kindle. In my experience it's actually pretty good: there's little context given to the translations, which sucks, but it contains many words and secondary meanings you wouldn't find in the Shogakukan. On the flipside, the conciseness of it means you can see most of the translations in the snippet without having to scroll down. Can save you some time.
taco543
Member
(05-12-2017, 03:30 PM)
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I'm using the app memrise to learn Japanese, so far I've just started kanji. I'm learning it, but damn it's tough.
Beckx
Member
(05-12-2017, 03:32 PM)
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Originally Posted by Kilrogg

You don't need to buy a Japanese ebook to get the dictionary. Granted, it's kinda hard to find (I can't remember how to find it off the top of my head), but the option to download it as a standalone dictionary for free, as well the Daijisen, is there. There's also an open-source dictionary you can get via your browser and then import to your Kindle. In my experience it's actually pretty good: there's little context given to the translations, which sucks, but it contains many words and secondary meanings you wouldn't find in the Shogakukan. On the flipside, the conciseness of it means you can see most of the translations in the snippet without having to scroll down. Can save you some time.

i'll search for those and how to add them. smaller snippets are good because if i really want a lot of context i'll jump over to kenkyuusha on my phone anyway.
Kilrogg
paid requisite penance
(05-12-2017, 03:38 PM)
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Originally Posted by Beckx

i'll search for those and how to add them. smaller snippets are good because if i really want a lot of context i'll jump over to kenkyuusha on my phone anyway.

This is the dictionary I was talking about: https://github.com/jrfonseca/jmdict-kindle
Just follow the instructions below the files list to set it up.
Beckx
Member
(05-12-2017, 03:45 PM)
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Originally Posted by Kilrogg

This is the dictionary I was talking about: https://github.com/jrfonseca/jmdict-kindle
Just follow the instructions below the files list to set it up.

awesome, thanks kilrogg
Kilrogg
paid requisite penance
(05-12-2017, 03:56 PM)
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Originally Posted by Beckx

awesome, thanks kilrogg

De nada. I mean いいよ。
213372bu
My Phriend
(05-20-2017, 02:53 AM)
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From what I'm reading in my books (Genki+some supp books I got) ではありません is the most formal way to write a "negation sentence" (やまださんは学生ではありません) and じゃないです is the most colloquial way to write it (with what I currently know).

You can also mix it so it can go じゃありません or ではないです since じゃ is a contraction of では and ありません/ないです mark the same "not" sentence.

But if I were to practically go around in Japan, which would I use more often? My books contradict which is the most common, is it safer to just go around using the most formal way possible of speaking sentences? Or is that too stiff?
Aquavelvaman
Member
(05-20-2017, 04:53 AM)
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Do Japanese people refer to clear soft drinks (like Sprite) as "cider"?

Same question about bell peppers being "paprika"
TheSporkWithin
Member
(05-20-2017, 06:18 AM)
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Originally Posted by 213372bu

From what I'm reading in my books (Genki+some supp books I got) ではありません is the most formal way to write a "negation sentence" (やまださんは学生ではありません) and じゃないです is the most colloquial way to write it (with what I currently know).

You can also mix it so it can go じゃありません or ではないです since じゃ is a contraction of では and ありません/ないです mark the same "not" sentence.

But if I were to practically go around in Japan, which would I use more often? My books contradict which is the most common, is it safer to just go around using the most formal way possible of speaking sentences? Or is that too stiff?

じゃないです is the most common, everyday way to talk. じゃありません sounds a little cold by comparison, and ではありません sounds businesslike and clinical. I don't think I've ever heard ではないです, it's just a really awkward mixture of formality.

Originally Posted by Aquavelvaman

Do Japanese people refer to clear soft drinks (like Sprite) as "cider"?

Same question about bell peppers being "paprika"

I think cider is generally "crisp carbonated beverage," I've seen non-clear ciders before.

パプリカ is for red or yellow peppers. Green peppers are always ピーマン as far as I've seen. I've seen larger green bell peppers referred to as ビッグピーマン or 大ピーマン.
Aquavelvaman
Member
(05-20-2017, 06:43 AM)
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Originally Posted by TheSporkWithin

I think cider is generally "crisp carbonated beverage," I've seen non-clear ciders before.

パプリカ is for red or yellow peppers. Green peppers are always ピーマン as far as I've seen. I've seen larger green bell peppers referred to as ビッグピーマン or 大ピーマン.

Basically the same as Korean, as I suspected. Green peppers are 피망 and the other colors are 파프리카. Everybody thinks paprika is the correct English word for the vegetable.
Kilrogg
paid requisite penance
(05-20-2017, 11:15 AM)
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Originally Posted by TheSporkWithin

パプリカ is for red or yellow peppers. Green peppers are always ピーマン as far as I've seen. I've seen larger green bell peppers referred to as ビッグピーマン or 大ピーマン.

Originally Posted by Aquavelvaman

Basically the same as Korean, as I suspected. Green peppers are 피망 and the other colors are 파프리카. Everybody thinks paprika is the correct English word for the vegetable.

Just for added fuckery, if anyone reading this is French, "piment" in French, which is pronounced like ピーマン in Japanese, doesn't mean "bell pepper", but "spicy pepper" (e.g. chili pepper, Cayenne pepper, ghost pepper...)... But "spicy pepper" is "唐辛子" in Japanese. tl;dr: "piment" is not "ピーマン". Eh.
Splash Wave
Member
(Yesterday, 07:27 PM)
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Can anyone recommend some kind of online class that I can work on during downtime at work? I find myself with a lot of time to just sit and twiddle my thumbs, and I'd like to do something a little more productive than that.

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