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Icolin
Member
(04-02-2017, 12:15 AM)
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Originally Posted by MidnightCowboy

Lubezki is obviously extremely talented, one of the best in the game right now, but something about his movies sometimes rubs me the wrong way. Just get this artificial feeling, like a pretty picture with no substance behind it. I put it more on directing I guess, I just want him attached to a more traditionally shot movie. He's just too showy.

Maybe if you're only thinking of his Malick movies, I guess. His movies with Innaritu and Cuaron aren't like that to me, and stuff like Sleepy Hollow, Burn After Reading, and Ali are pretty traditionally shot, although that was awhile ago I guess.
Discotheque
Pam Oliver sextape
(04-02-2017, 12:16 AM)
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Originally Posted by Icolin

Maybe if you're only thinking of his Malick movies, I guess. His movies with Innaritu and Cuaron aren't like that to me.

breh no way. his movies with Innaritu are the prime example of that moreso than any of his other work.
Icolin
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(04-02-2017, 12:19 AM)
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Originally Posted by Discotheque

breh no way. his movies with Innaritu are the prime example of that moreso than any of his other work.

I don't get that from The Revenant, but you have a point when it comes to Birdman.

Regardless, Lubezki is definitely neck and neck with Roger Deakins as the best cinematographer right now, but I'd like him to do something smaller in scale for sure.
Snowman Prophet of Doom
Member
(04-02-2017, 12:20 AM)
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Originally Posted by Discotheque

breh no way. his movies with Innaritu are the prime example of that moreso than any of his other work.

Yeah, the Malick movies are WAY better-lensed, with more substance in each shot. Malick would have been better letting Lubezki's cinematography do all the talking for him in these last few movies, rather than the diminishing returns of fucking his favored aesthetic raw.
phoenixyz
Member
(04-02-2017, 12:24 AM)
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Originally Posted by Icolin

but I'd like him to do something smaller in scale for sure.

I mean, Lubezki did Last Days in the Desert recently...
Puck Beaverton
Member
(04-02-2017, 12:34 AM)
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Lubezki is 75% of the reason I watch modern Malick
Pachimari
Member
(04-02-2017, 02:14 AM)
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I watched 9 movies in March:

1. Jackie
2. Saban's Power Rangers (2017)
3. Doctor Strange
4. Mighty Morphin Power Rangers: The Movie (1995)
5. Copenhagen
6. Logan
7. Moana
8. Turbo: A Power Rangers Movie (1997)
9. Ghost in the Shell (1995)
not psycho
Member
(04-02-2017, 02:17 AM)
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First time watches of March

★★★★
Mustang (2015)
Everybody Wants Some!! (2016)
Sweet Smell of Success (1957)
Hunt for the Wilderpeople (2016)
A New Leaf (1971)

★★★☆
Don't Look Now (1973)
Captain Fantastic (2016)
Lady Snowblood (1973)
Baby Cart in Peril (1972)
Baby Cart to Hades (1972)
Kubo and the Two Strings (2016)
My Cousin Rachel (1952)
Baby Cart in the Land of Demons (1973)

★★☆☆
Donkey Skin (1970)
How to Marry a Millionaire (1953)
White Heaven in Hell (1974)
Puck Beaverton
Member
(04-02-2017, 02:23 AM)
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Finally got around to rewatching Before Sunrise with the Criterion edition.

Jesus Christ I knew I loved this movie but this viewing pushed me over the edge. Goddamnit.
Sean C
Member
(04-02-2017, 02:33 AM)
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Top 5 First Watches of March
1. The Little Foxes
2. Logan
3. What Ever Happened to Baby Jane?
4. 20th Century Women
5. The Gold Rush

Top 5 Rewatches of March
1. Before Sunset
2. Before Midnight
3. Two Days, One Night
4. Before Sunrise
5. The Handmaiden

M (1931): One of Fritz Lang's last German films, and his first sound film (sound is still a work in progress, so the sound design here renders many moments as virtually like a silent film -- there's a spooky lack of ambient noise, especially). This is widely identified as one of the best films of its era (and, perhaps, ever made). That's a pretty high bar, one this doesn't remotely clear; I'm sure it has been influential, and the cinematography is impressive throughout, but virtually everything that's interesting about it comes in the last couple of scenes (particularly the extended trial sequence). It's interesting to see Peter Lorre acting in his native German, before he became the weird/eccentric foreigner in every Hollywood film.

Julius Caesar (1953): Wow, what a cast: James Mason, Marlon Brando, John Gielgud, Edmond O'Brien, Greer Garson, Deborah Kerr, a variety of other respected character actors from the period (Garson and Kerr are pretty much wasted in the play's throwaway female roles, admittedly). The film is exceptionally strong in the portion corresponding to the first three acts, but I've always felt the play somewhat deflates after Antony's iconic funeral oration. This feels like the climax; after that, you just have the drawn out resolution to the civil war subplot (including the character of Octavian, who just appears out of nowhere).

The Salesman (2016): Asghar Farhadi's most recent film, and last year's winner for the Foreign Language Film Oscar thanks to a timely assist from President Trump. It's a good film, to be sure, though I think it falls a bit short of Farhadi's full ambitions for it. The title is taken from Death of a Salesman, a production of which is being put on by the characters in it, but I don't find the links that the director is trying to make between the play and the events of this movie to be terribly meaningful. Stars Shahab Hosseini (Farhadi's favourite leading man) and Taraneh Alidoosti are both excellent (Alidoosti's portrayal of a woman haunted by a traumatic experience is particularly moving; one wishes we saw more of her separate from her husband)
Last edited by Sean C; 04-02-2017 at 02:39 AM.
Snowman Prophet of Doom
Member
(04-02-2017, 03:02 AM)
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In retrospect, the praise for Javier Bardem in No Country for Old Men is inscrutable. He's barely doing anything in the movie, nor is a glassy-eyed stare with a bad haircut particularly scary, and he's not even particularly accurate to the character McCarthy wrote, if you take the dialogue on its own.
Last edited by Snowman Prophet of Doom; 04-02-2017 at 03:11 AM.
Freeza Under The Shower
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(04-02-2017, 03:32 AM)
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Originally Posted by Snowman Prophet of Doom

In retrospect, the praise for Javier Bardem in No Country for Old Men is inscrutable. He's barely doing anything in the movie, nor is a glassy-eyed stare with a bad haircut particularly scary, and he's not even particularly accurate to the character McCarthy wrote, if you take the dialogue on its own.

I'm going to say this more to validate my own liking for it than actually try to 'disagree' with you:

Viewer's privilege of knowing things characters do not, as part of the sense-making of a movie. It's not the image that is supposed to be scary, that's the point of showing the mundane banality of (potential) evil. It's the potential of something happening or being narrowly avoided that brings excitement.

Also the reason why overly extensive exposition dumps, characters saying what's happening on the screen, and explaining everything are bad writing. Image, sound, and meaning should never be exactly the same if you intend for something to be viewed in a hermeneutic manner. (I suppose I could also say 'dialectic' but I've grown allergic to that term). If that difference doesn't exist, it's a singular message transfer and essentially just propaganda. /validation


I don't really disagree that the part itself is not that big, but on the movie as a whole it's also a center piece of making it work at all. Or at least I can't imagine it being a functional movie without it. I'm not familiar with the novel, and I don't really believe in retracing an adaptation to its source, due to media being incompatible with each other in form and thereby message. As it is, a book will almost always be superior to an adaptation.

so ehm, is Messo coming back in two weeks or is he on a more permanent vacation from gaf? He seems like the least ban-worthy user on this board, so I'm kinda shocked that happened.
Rhomega Beta
Member
(04-02-2017, 04:45 AM)
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Top 5 of March:

1. Blazing Saddles
2. Goodfellas
3. The Graduate
4. Power Rangers
5. Once Upon A Time In America
AngmarsKing701
Member
(04-02-2017, 04:54 AM)
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Beauty and the Beast (2017) - I tempered expectations with this a little, which might be why I ended up liking it quite a bit. The original is probably my favorite Disney animated film, right up there with Lion King. I was worried about Emma Watson and the auto-tuning based on what I'd heard, though I tried very hard to avoid a lot of spoilery stuff.

In the end, I have to say she didn't come off that bad, and after having to listen to Pierce Brosnan in Mamma Mia and Russell Crowe in Les Miz NOT be auto-tuned and sound god-awful, I'm actually pleased they did enough to make her come off at least in tune, even though it was obvious in many places that whatever she'd come out with needed some tweaking.

I thought the Beast CGI work was pretty well done, and the other characters were likewise endearing. There were some great throwback moments, there were some additions--a couple I considered wasted time while at least two I considered improvements over the original. Luke Evans was a great Gaston, but when you get to be the bad guy and you really ham it up in the role, it usually comes off as looking like you had a ton of fun.

All in all, I enjoyed it and will undoubtedly buy the blu-ray.

4 / 5
PassiveObserver
Member
(04-02-2017, 05:00 AM)
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11 first watches, 2 rewatches in March.

1. After Hours - Rewatch. Best shit ever
2. I Don't Feel at Home in This World Anymore - Loved it
3. Get Out - Ditto
4. Radio Days - Comfort food Woody
5. Nocturnal Animals - Didn't love it like I thought I would but gave me plenty to chew on

Gonna have to catch The Discovery on Netflix. The director's previous The One I Love was a fun loopy watch, and I'm happy to catch more Rooney Mara.
Cripplegate
Member
(04-02-2017, 05:09 AM)
Best new movie I saw in March: Window Horses, or The Poetic Persian Epiphany of Rosie Ming
The only rewatch that mattered in March: In the Mood for Love in 35mm

And my first viewing/review for April:

Obit (8.5/10) - Vanessa Gould directs this documentary about the obituary writers working for the New York Times. A good contrast to Kedi, the cat documentary I saw earlier this week, which is nice and cute but doesn't really offer much you couldn't already get out of a hundred youtube videos. Obit actually digs, and probes, and examines its subject from various angles... it informs, and entertains, but more than all of that, it manages to find and tell a good story. It follows the writers over the course of a single day at the office, and only showcases the stories they work on that particular day, but through this basic structure, Gould is able to contextualize their entire job: the hour by hour work that they actually do, their relationship to the rest of the Times, their interaction with other departments, and the political and aesthetic choices they individually make in their own writing, as writers, or collectively as a journalistic department.

It also becomes a surprisingly cathartic journey, too, as the film creates a space for viewers to confront and even find a bit of closure with some recent "big" deaths, like Prince, and Bowie, and Robin Williams. And through these big news stories (because, after all, writing an obit is still reporting the news), the film is able to go more broad, addressing the ways in which we all confront death, live with the knowledge of mortality, and celebrate life. This is a film about death that ends up being about how to live. This is a film that finds art and philosophy in obituary columns. I'll admit, I had a tear in my eye at one point. Also, it's ridiculously funny. This is a film that also finds humor in death, and thank god (the final shot is an incredible punch line, and release valve, so I won't spoil it). My favorite sections involve the massive media archive known as The Morgue, and its wonderfully jovial caretaker. There's a beautiful absurdity to the "advance obits" kept down there.

One actual criticism: The soundtrack sucks. I swear to god, I've heard background music like this in a thousand other documentaries.
Last edited by Cripplegate; 04-02-2017 at 05:13 AM.
Snowman Prophet of Doom
Member
(04-02-2017, 05:27 AM)
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Originally Posted by Freeza Under The Shower

I'm going to say this more to validate my own liking for it than actually try to 'disagree' with you:

Viewer's privilege of knowing things characters do not, as part of the sense-making of a movie. It's not the image that is supposed to be scary, that's the point of showing the mundane banality of (potential) evil. It's the potential of something happening or being narrowly avoided that brings excitement.

Also the reason why overly extensive exposition dumps, characters saying what's happening on the screen, and explaining everything are bad writing. Image, sound, and meaning should never be exactly the same if you intend for something to be viewed in a hermeneutic manner. (I suppose I could also say 'dialectic' but I've grown allergic to that term). If that difference doesn't exist, it's a singular message transfer and essentially just propaganda. /validation


I don't really disagree that the part itself is not that big, but on the movie as a whole it's also a center piece of making it work at all. Or at least I can't imagine it being a functional movie without it. I'm not familiar with the novel, and I don't really believe in retracing an adaptation to its source, due to media being incompatible with each other in form and thereby message. As it is, a book will almost always be superior to an adaptation.

so ehm, is Messo coming back in two weeks or is he on a more permanent vacation from gaf? He seems like the least ban-worthy user on this board, so I'm kinda shocked that happened.

The character basically just exists as a philosophical construct within the universe of the movie, without any kind of grounded believability whatsoever. Setting aside that he is almost comic book levels of untouchable in terms of his behavior in the movie, his inner life is basically just a half-baked sense of his own quality as a "force of nature". I don't care if he's specifically like the character in the book, as McCarthy is largely an overrated writer, but he's not even a believable human being in the movie's already portentous reality.
kevin1025
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(04-02-2017, 05:35 AM)
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Originally Posted by Puck Beaverton

Finally got around to rewatching Before Sunrise with the Criterion edition.

Jesus Christ I knew I loved this movie but this viewing pushed me over the edge. Goddamnit.

How is the Criterion release?
Ridley327
Member
(04-02-2017, 05:37 AM)
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Suddenly in the Dark: An interesting hybrid of domestic drama, Eurosleaze stylistic touches and just a shade of the kind of paranoid psychological horror that's not too far removed from the likes of Polanski. It takes a while to really get going, but the fractured perspective is used to good effect, even as the more abstract images rely frequently on shooting through either a kaleidoscope or through the bottom of some kind of glass bottle. It was also rather pleasing to see a good deal of unpredictability to the film, leading up to a final half hour that you'll surely need to strap yourself in for.

With any luck, I'll be catching North by Northwest in a theater tomorrow. I don't think I've seen that since before the turn of the millennium, so this should be a real treat.
Puck Beaverton
Member
(04-02-2017, 05:59 AM)
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Originally Posted by kevin1025

How is the Criterion release?

The packaging is great, and the covers work better in person than they do as a jpeg. Transfer for Sunrise is good, not anything mindblowingly gorgeous, but Sunrise in 1080 looks good and is obviously better so...
Sean C
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(04-02-2017, 06:03 AM)
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Originally Posted by kevin1025

How is the Criterion release?

Wonderful.
kevin1025
Member
(04-02-2017, 06:19 AM)
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Originally Posted by Puck Beaverton

The packaging is great, and the covers work better in person than they do as a jpeg. Transfer for Sunrise is good, not anything mindblowingly gorgeous, but Sunrise in 1080 looks good and is obviously better so...

Originally Posted by Sean C

Wonderful.

Awesome, thanks! I'll be keeping an eye out for one of those fancy Criterion sales and will pick it up, my four Criterion Blu-rays are feeling lonesome.
TheOnlyOneHeEverFeared
Member
(04-02-2017, 09:38 AM)
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Despite the grueling depravity, the sleaziness, and the sheer mire The Neon Demon leads us into, It was a truly transcendent cinema experience for me. Jealousy, vanity, narcissism, superficiality- all infections infesting the films diseased perception of LA, a corrupting sickness of a city that pushes Jesse's arduous journey onwards towards it's logical extreme. Elle Fanning's electric performance determines the narrative, while the directors wonderfully indulgent mind and vision provides what could best be described as the emotional thrust.

The images he summons are magical, gorgeously absurd and hyper-stylized, telling a story all their own parallel to Fanning's descent into hell via LA modelling studios. I've seen some people say the film is nothing but that, pretty images and a hollow narrative, composed of undeveloped characters and shallow lines of dialogue. But it's much more than that. The director is a grotesque artist, undeniably intoxicated with the exploration of the darkness of the human psyche in contrast to the exteriors we create to conceal it. The Neon Demon is metaphorical and seedy, an mesmerising fairy-tale set to endless flashing lights and electric dance music, telling a tragic, yet vicious fable of the classic tragedy of yet another person's innocence forfeitted to the sordid charms of Los Angeles.
thenexus6
Member
(04-02-2017, 10:09 AM)
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March:

04 Blood Father
Train to Busan
05 Robocop
Total Recall
07 Don't Breathe
11 High and Low
22 The Hidden Fortress
24 The Kingdom of Dreams and Madness
27 Demolition
30 Ghost in the Shell (new one)

Rewatches were Robocop, Total Recall and Kingdom of Dreams and Madness. Best new watch is tough -- High and Low or Fortress.
Divius
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(04-02-2017, 10:58 AM)
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Regardless of quality, I very much enjoyed working my way through a few movie franchises (X-Men and Fast & Furious) so I think I'll continue down that road (while also hopefully increasing the quality of the movies). Up next Lone Wolf and Cub, after that Dekalog (not really a franchise, but has been on my watchlist for years) and I'll be doing horror franchises in October as well.

Anyone got any franchise-binge recommendations? I'm looking for 4+ movies, otherwise it's just a trilogy.
Last edited by Divius; 04-02-2017 at 11:03 AM.
TheFlow
Member
(04-02-2017, 12:03 PM)
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Top 5 watches

Chungking Express
Throne of blood
The bad sleep well
Logan
I don't feel at home in this world anymore


worst watch:

Miami vice.

Originally Posted by Divius

Regardless of quality, I very much enjoyed working my way through a few movie franchises (X-Men and Fast & Furious) so I think I'll continue down that road (while also hopefully increasing the quality of the movies). Up next Lone Wolf and Cub, after that Dekalog (not really a franchise, but has been on my watchlist for years) and I'll be doing horror franchises in October as well.

Anyone got any franchise-binge recommendations? I'm looking for 4+ movies, otherwise it's just a trilogy.

Lone wolf and cub is the best Samurai series I have ever watched.
Last edited by TheFlow; 04-02-2017 at 12:06 PM.
TreyoftheDead
Member
(04-02-2017, 12:25 PM)
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Top 5 for March:

1. Pickup on South Street
2. The Big Heat
3. Arrival
4. Shake Hands with the Devil
5. Miami Vice

Top Rewatch for March:

Trainspotting
TheFlow
Member
(04-02-2017, 12:47 PM)
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Originally Posted by TreyoftheDead

Top 5 for March:

1. Pickup on South Street
2. The Big Heat
3. Arrival
4. Shake Hands with the Devil
5. Miami Vice

Top Rewatch for March:

Trainspotting

YO! haven't seen you in forever .
Chumley
Member
(04-02-2017, 12:49 PM)
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Originally Posted by Discotheque

breh no way. his movies with Innaritu are the prime example of that moreso than any of his other work.

...What?

The Revenant is like one of the 3 best shot films ever made. There isn't a single thing artificial about it and some of the camera moves he pulled off had never been done before and haven't been done since, all of it in the harshest conditions possible with 100 percent natural light.

Originally Posted by Snowman Prophet of Doom

Yeah, the Malick movies are WAY better-lensed, with more substance in each shot. Malick would have been better letting Lubezki's cinematography do all the talking for him in these last few movies, rather than the diminishing returns of fucking his favored aesthetic raw.

You should specify which Malick movies you're talking about. I can see an argument for The New World and Tree of Life, but not at all for To the Wonder and Knight of Cups.

TNW and ToL probably have more moments of jaw dropping beauty than The Revenant, but The Revenant is immersive and unbelievably daring (technically and creatively) with it's cinematography in a way no Malick film has ever been, not even close. The breath on the lens, the drops of snow, almost getting inside of a horse carcass, crane shots that transition from a wide close up on Leo to expand over the horizon, the sequences with no cuts, the rapids scene, the list goes on and on.

My own list of Lubezki's best work would start with Rev and follow with Children of Men and then Tree of Life.
Last edited by Chumley; 04-02-2017 at 12:57 PM.
TheFlow
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(04-02-2017, 01:41 PM)
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Originally Posted by Snowman Prophet of Doom

I mostly just think he's very one-dimensional and has no real sense for decent characterization (and is a pretty bad director of actors, tbh), but I find most accusations of -isms nowadays are often overblown and are typically an example of bending reality to fit an agenda, rather than the inverse. To me, Raimi is the only director who had a sense for how to blend campiness and seriousness (even in SM3, fucking fight me nerds) in an aesthetically cohesive way, not to mention he simply knew how to wring characterization out of small moments and interactions.

tbh, being the best comic book movie is a bit like being voted ladies' man at the Brony Convention, but that's a whole other conversation.

Edit: Lubezki's lensing is likely what is going to be remembered of Malick post-Tree of Life, let's be real.

stay banned. there are so many great stories told through comics, but Directors fail at bringing them to screen. See Snyder.

Persepolis is still the greatest comic book to movie adaption. and look forward to the criterion release.
BaronLundi
Member
(04-02-2017, 01:44 PM)
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Slow month.

Best:
- Anomalisa
- What's up doc?

OK:
- Train to Busan

Meh:
- Sherlock Holmes (Ritchie)
Zousi
Junior Member
(04-02-2017, 02:07 PM)
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38 films in March.

Top 5:

1. Listen to Me Marlon
2. Logan
3. The Master
4. All Quiet on the Western Front (1930)
5. Shane
DeadTrees
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(04-02-2017, 02:11 PM)
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Originally Posted by Snowman Prophet of Doom

and he's not even particularly accurate to the character McCarthy wrote

Originally Posted by Snowman Prophet of Doom

I don't care if he's specifically like the character in the book, as McCarthy is largely an overrated writer

"Guys, your favorite band sucks for being insufficiently faithful to your other favorite band. I'm not being a drama queen or anything--my analysis is richly nuanced and has adverbs in it."

[five minutes pass]

"I forgot to mention, your other favorite band also sucks."
Fancy Clown
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(04-02-2017, 02:22 PM)
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Best new watches:
1. The Bad Sleep Well
2. Body Double
3. Carlito's Way
4. Logan
5. The Untouchables

Best rewatch:
The Matrix
AngmarsKing701
Member
(04-02-2017, 03:01 PM)
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All this arguing over BvS is going to get me to watch it, isn't it.
Snowman Prophet of Doom
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(04-02-2017, 03:02 PM)
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Originally Posted by DeadTrees

"Guys, your favorite band sucks for being insufficiently faithful to your other favorite band. I'm not being a drama queen or anything--my analysis is richly nuanced and has adverbs in it."

[five minutes pass]

"I forgot to mention, your other favorite band also sucks."

Yeah, my point was mostly that I can't even see an argument that he really "embodied the character" or anything like that, whichbis what people often fall back on when defending performances in adaptations and something, iirc, I saw said about him in that film.

Edit: The Revenant is like a 2-hour screensaver, the shots never communicate anything of greater depth about what's happening on the screen. Technically impressive, sure, but Inarritu's eye is not one geared toward storytelling. Even Lubezki's work on the lesser Malick movies has the quality of poetically resonating with the on-screen events, and in fact the movies would have been stronger if they'd simply leaned into that strength instead of sticking in Malick's wheelhouse.
Last edited by Snowman Prophet of Doom; 04-02-2017 at 03:05 PM.
TreyoftheDead
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(04-02-2017, 03:11 PM)
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Originally Posted by TheFlow

YO! haven't seen you in forever .

Yo! Yeah, I got a new job so my time for movie watching had all but dried up for a while.
Ridley327
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(04-02-2017, 03:17 PM)
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The potency of the images in The Revenant would have been better served in a shorter film. At 2.5 hours long, there are only so many times that you can admire too damn many landscape shots or treeline shots pointing towards the sky. None of that would fix inherently flawed concepts in the film, like the weird "breathing on the camera" moments (last I checked, this film wasn't Hard to be a God) or the stinky desperation for profundity of all the stuff with Glass' wife, be they straight lifts of stuff other directors have done already, or the sheer guffaw-inducing might of that goddamned floating wife shot, but at least we'd get to the better stuff a lot quicker.
ronaldthump
Banned
(04-02-2017, 03:19 PM)
Tried to watch new resident evil (final chapter). Lasted all of 30 minutes before I said nope and we went out to the pub.

Shockingly bad.
Cripplegate
Member
(04-02-2017, 05:59 PM)

Originally Posted by Ridley327

None of that would fix inherently flawed concepts in the film, like the weird "breathing on the camera" moments (last I checked, this film wasn't Hard to be a God) or the stinky desperation for profundity of all the stuff with Glass' wife, be they straight lifts of stuff other directors have done already, or the sheer guffaw-inducing might of that goddamned floating wife shot, but at least we'd get to the better stuff a lot quicker.

Yeah, this is where discussion gets tricky, because I always feel like we credit cinematographers too quickly for "visuals" in general, when a lot of their work is specifically lighting the scene. And even the decision to shoot in natural light is a decision born out of a conversation between the cinematographer and director, and no matter how good Lubezki's work is on The Revenant - and it's quite good throughout, obviously - I still think the film is kinda terrible visually, for all of the creative decisions you mention and others beside (and so much of what IS here is just Iñárritu cribbing from Malick, and Cuarón, and Tarkovsky, and so on).

So clearly, I'm in the camp that doesn't find Iñárritu's visuals to be purposeful (or even good, I guess), and also I actually completely hated the unbroken action shots in The Revenant. Cuarón does that stuff so much better (and how much of that, anyways, should be credited to the director, or the cinematographer, or really, the special effects department?).
Last edited by Cripplegate; 04-02-2017 at 06:01 PM.
xrnzaaas
Member
(04-02-2017, 06:27 PM)
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Catching up on some horrors/thrillers :)

The Pyramid was a typical 5 out of 10 movie. The script isn't very original and it's full of cliches the worst thing about it is that you already know which character will make it to the end, the acting and the CGI was very uneven (the reporter lady was horrible, so were the close ups on the main creature), also it didn't help that the found footage scenes had really "fake" image distortions (because obviously you get pixelization when there's a problem with the image). But overall it was watchable (I like horrors taking place in confined spaces) and having Jay from The Inbetweeners play a serious cameraman role made me laugh.

Bye Bye Man wasn't awful, but it should've been better. The first part of the movie is much better than the second one where they started to go over the top with new 'is it real or not' twists. Also the Bye Bye Man jump scares were really weak the shop display one was probably the worst, but thankfully the movie still managed to maintain nice sense of dread. It was watchable and you might find it entertaining if you enjoyed horrors like Nightmare on Elm Street or Candyman.

Pet was a very good thriller. The movie managed to surprise me at least three times (with the dear diary I'm a serial killer reveal, with the "accident" and even with the ending) and that doesn't happen often. If you feel uncomfortable or think you know where it's going after seeing the first 15-20 minutes don't drop it. I'm glad I stayed and kept watching. :)
Snowman Prophet of Doom
Member
(04-02-2017, 06:44 PM)
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Cuaron is also an eh director. Kubrick, Tarkovsky, Tarr, Angelopoulos, these are the long take guys to imitate.
Divius
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(04-02-2017, 08:27 PM)
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Originally Posted by TheFlow

Lone wolf and cub is the best Samurai series I have ever watched.

Good to hear, I'm super excited for it! I watched, and liked, Shogun Assassin and had my eye on the series for a while but kinda forgot. When it was mentioned in the samurai movie thread it reminded me so I'll be starting soon.
Ridley327
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(04-02-2017, 08:37 PM)
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Well, they cancelled the earlier screening of North by Northwest due to the amp blowing out, so we'll try this again later this evening.
T Dollarz
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(04-02-2017, 08:48 PM)
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Best New Watches of March:
1. Logan (James Mangold, 2017)
2. Badlands (Terrence Malick, 1973)
3. Metropolis (Fritz Lang, 1927)
4. The Rules of the Game (Jean Renoir, 1939)
5. Raw (Julia Ducournau, 2017)
6. Kong: Skull Island (Jordan Vogt-Roberts, 2017)
7. Battleship Potemkin (Sergei M. Eisenstein, 1925)

Top Rewatches:
1. X2 (Bryan Singer, 2003)
2. X-Men: First Class (Matthew Vaughn, 2011)
3. X-Men: Days of Future Past (Bryan Singer, 2014)

Days of Heaven reminded me of its greatness. One of the most arresting audio/visual experiences I've seen. Malick's masterpiece.

Song to Song is easily my favorite movie of his since Tree of Life. Great to see him play with a more coherent narrative again, and I thought all four of the leads were doing great work. Also, Val Kilmer losing his shit on stage was pretty fantastic.
True Savior
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(04-02-2017, 08:57 PM)
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Originally Posted by Divius

Anyone got any franchise-binge recommendations? I'm looking for 4+ movies, otherwise it's just a trilogy.

Zatoichi
Battles Without Honor and Humanity
Cripplegate
Member
(04-02-2017, 09:35 PM)

Originally Posted by Divius

Anyone got any franchise-binge recommendations? I'm looking for 4+ movies, otherwise it's just a trilogy.

Tora-san, just because I'd like to see someone try.
Chumley
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(04-02-2017, 10:04 PM)
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Originally Posted by Cripplegate

Yeah, this is where discussion gets tricky, because I always feel like we credit cinematographers too quickly for "visuals" in general, when a lot of their work is specifically lighting the scene. And even the decision to shoot in natural light is a decision born out of a conversation between the cinematographer and director, and no matter how good Lubezki's work is on The Revenant - and it's quite good throughout, obviously - I still think the film is kinda terrible visually, for all of the creative decisions you mention and others beside (and so much of what IS here is just Iñárritu cribbing from Malick, and Cuarón, and Tarkovsky, and so on).

So clearly, I'm in the camp that doesn't find Iñárritu's visuals to be purposeful (or even good, I guess), and also I actually completely hated the unbroken action shots in The Revenant. Cuarón does that stuff so much better (and how much of that, anyways, should be credited to the director, or the cinematographer, or really, the special effects department?).

This doesn't make sense. First, cinematographers are responsible for everything that composes a shot, not just lighting. I would get fucking fired if a director ever asked me how I want to compose a shot, and I just shrugged my shoulders and said "I dunno, it's up to you". Inarritu's films before Birdman looked nothing like they do now, so the argument that Lubezki plays some kind of minor role is just wrong.

And as far as him "cribbing" from other directors, that's always such a lazy argument. Of course he's influenced by Tarkovsky. Herzog is too. It's a good influence to have. What exactly is your point there? What specifically in The Revenant is stolen or unoriginal? Because I seem to remember a dozen or more shots that were executed with technical precision and consideration I've only seen in a handful of other films.
Ridley327
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(04-02-2017, 10:09 PM)
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Originally Posted by Chumley

This doesn't make sense. First, cinematographers are responsible for everything that composes a shot, not just lighting. I would get fucking fired if a director ever asked me how I want to compose a shot, and I just shrugged my shoulders and said "I dunno, it's up to you". Inarritu's films before Birdman looked nothing like they do now, so the argument that Lubezki plays some kind of minor role is just wrong.

And as far as him "cribbing" from other directors, that's always such a lazy argument. Of course he's influenced by Tarkovsky. Herzog is too. It's a good influence to have. What exactly is your point there? What specifically in The Revenant is stolen or unoriginal? Because I seem to remember a dozen or more shots that were executed with technical precision and consideration I've only seen in a handful of other films.

The whole "bird erupting out of a gunshot wound" shot is cribbed wholesale from The Holy Mountain. Like, I get that Jodorowsky isn't exactly Mr. Mainstream Filmmaker, but anyone with an interest in world cinema, it was rather shocking to see such a direct lift like that.
MidnightCowboy
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(04-02-2017, 10:14 PM)
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The Revenant leaves a good first impression, but the more it goes on, the more it starts to feel like a video game. For how much they loved to talk about how natural everything in that movie was, from the lighting to the environments, that movie is hella constructed. It's too scripted to feel like an engaging experience. At least for me.

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