• Register
  • TOS
  • Privacy
  • @NeoGAF
  • Like

cheezcake
Member
(01-12-2017, 08:57 AM)
cheezcake's Avatar

Originally Posted by Sarcastico

You want to bang in the kitchen sink?

You don't?
zoukka
Member
(01-12-2017, 08:59 AM)
zoukka's Avatar

Originally Posted by Sarcastico

In my case, we have our own room.

But the sounds man...

Damn it just sounds so weird and cumbersome to me. It was weird and cumbersome when I had to jack off in peace when I was a kid so I can't even imagine what it would be like to try and have a relationship under my parents roof.
echoshifting
Banned
(01-12-2017, 09:04 AM)
echoshifting's Avatar
No hurry. It happens when it happens.
Sarcastico
Member
(01-12-2017, 09:09 AM)
Sarcastico's Avatar

Originally Posted by cheezcake

You don't?

I mean, why would you?

Originally Posted by zoukka

But the sounds man...

Damn it just sounds so weird and cumbersome to me. It was weird and cumbersome when I had to jack off in peace when I was a kid so I can't even imagine what it would be like to try and have a relationship under my parents roof.

To be fair our house has very thick walls and the only way someone might hear us is if they're eavesdropping outside our room door. I get how that can be a concern.
cheezcake
Member
(01-12-2017, 09:13 AM)
cheezcake's Avatar

Originally Posted by Sarcastico

I mean, why would you?

I mean it was partially a joke, not kitchen sink but kitchen absolutely. Everywhere really. It's more about the notion of freedom, I mean having to go to the bedroom everytime you two are feeling it and then worrying about noise. Plus the general awkwardness of knowing your parents are nearby and they damn well know what's happening.
SuperBanana
(01-12-2017, 09:15 AM)
SuperBanana's Avatar
Most people I know in their mid-late 20's are still at home unless they move in with a partner. It's so expensive here so they delay moving out.
hodgy100
Member
(01-12-2017, 09:17 AM)
hodgy100's Avatar
Don't out a limit on it. It should be when they are ready.
Octavianus
Member
(01-12-2017, 09:17 AM)
Octavianus's Avatar

Originally Posted by Vandiger

When they are financially stable?

Nah, just kick 'm out at 18.
Jindrax
Member
(01-12-2017, 09:19 AM)
Jindrax's Avatar
There's no age on it...
It's also not a question of ego or pride...
It's all financial, if you can afford it safely, do it.

I'm probably going to move out sometime 2018 or 2019 when I'm 24-25.
Why? Because I've been at uni for the passed 5 years (this is year 6) getting two masters degrees. My student jobs didn't pay enough to allow me to move out without financial help from my parents. So they suggested I stay home until I start working and can financially support myself without any debt.
Timbuktu
Member
(01-12-2017, 09:19 AM)
Timbuktu's Avatar

Originally Posted by zoukka

But the sounds man...

Damn it just sounds so weird and cumbersome to me. It was weird and cumbersome when I had to jack off in peace when I was a kid so I can't even imagine what it would be like to try and have a relationship under my parents roof.

It really depends on how the family gets on, and particularly if the spouse marrying into the family gets along with the parents and is ok with it. As it's been said, it is not that unusual in many cultures for three generations to live under one roof.nand have closer family ties. The kids were supposed to look after the parents when they get old before care homes came along.

I was a bit different. My parents moved abroad for a while but kept their house, but didn't want to let it out to strangers. So I'd let out my flat and took over the house for a few years by myself. As for the next generation, it really depends on where we are living and what is the realistic options are at that time. In bigger cities like London or Hong Kong it is getting tougher and tougher. I don't expect kids now to be able to afford a place without help or be stuck paying rent and forced to move every year.
Sarcastico
Member
(01-12-2017, 09:20 AM)
Sarcastico's Avatar

Originally Posted by cheezcake

I mean it was partially a joke, not kitchen sink but kitchen absolutely. Everywhere really. It's more about the notion of freedom, I mean having to go to the bedroom everytime you two are feeling it and then worrying about noise. Plus the general awkwardness of knowing your parents are nearby and they damn well know what's happening.

Well yeah I can understand it being very awkward if everyone can hear you getting it on.

I have never gotten the urge to do it in the kitchen or living room so can't really comment on that.
Ban Puncher
The Console Industry:
Pop Pop Pop Pop
(01-12-2017, 09:43 AM)
Ban Puncher's Avatar
"So you moved out of home because you were financially able to?"


NO I GOT MY OWN PLACE SO I CAN HAVE A HEARTY WANK ANYTIME I DAMN WELL PLEASE
Kaelan
Member
(01-12-2017, 09:58 AM)
Kaelan's Avatar

Originally Posted by Sobriquet

Why not?

Because most college kids save money and live in dorms and still end up coming home during break. I would say it's not until graduating from college that they should leave home.
Laughing Banana
Weeping Pickle
(01-12-2017, 10:02 AM)
Laughing Banana's Avatar
In my country, Indonesia, there is no stigma whatsoever for people who stayed with their folks even when they're 20, 30, 40, whatever. In fact, living with your folks together with your own wife/husband is a normal thing to do here.
Jack The Nipper
Can outshoot and shutdown Steph Curry at the local YMCA.
(01-12-2017, 10:29 AM)
Jack The Nipper's Avatar

Originally Posted by Kayhan

lol being stuck with your kids until they are 30.

Some people like thier kids and time together over anything else
Miles Quaritch
lemme stick dat Red Ring
(01-12-2017, 10:38 AM)
Miles Quaritch's Avatar
Why have kids if you have the expectation of washing your hands of your responsibility and telling them to get the fuck out by a certain age?

Save society the hassle of having to look after your spawn and have a vasectomy/have your tubes tied.
Dan27
Member
(01-12-2017, 10:39 AM)
Dan27's Avatar
They should move out when they can comfortably afford a place of their own.

In the UK the average first time buyer is getting to the mid to late 30s.
Derwind
Member
(01-12-2017, 10:43 AM)
Derwind's Avatar

Originally Posted by _Nemo

When you can afford to. In this day and age of sky rocketing cost of living, setting an age limit is stupid.

This.

I'd work with my kids so they get to the point where they can afford to move out rather than establish an arbitrary deadline.
Novocaine
Member
(01-12-2017, 10:46 AM)
Novocaine's Avatar

Originally Posted by Ban Puncher

"So you moved out of home because you were financially able to?"


NO I GOT MY OWN PLACE SO I CAN HAVE A HEARTY WANK ANYTIME I DAMN WELL PLEASE

Fuck yeah. In any room of the house too. No rules wanking is one of the best parts about moving out.
Sheentak
Member
(01-12-2017, 10:47 AM)
Sheentak's Avatar

Originally Posted by Dan27

They should move out when they can comfortably afford a place of their own.

In the UK the average first time buyer is getting to the mid to late 30s.

Even renting is getting scary just getting a room to rent is nearly my monthly salary at this point.
GrizzleBoy
Member
(01-12-2017, 10:51 AM)
Just imagine how much money MILLIONS upon MILLIONS of people waste paying half their salaries in rent, when they haven't even save a deposit for their own house, and will never be able to, because they're paying half their salaries in rent.

It's so stupid and I don't understand why people don't set themselves up for their futures first before jumping out into the wild. Well I suppose it's just social pressure.
jorma
is now taking requests
(01-12-2017, 10:55 AM)
No later than 18 unless they're in uni.
Symphonia
Member
(01-12-2017, 11:03 AM)
Symphonia's Avatar
Why should there be a set age for someone to move out? In this day and age, you can't expect someone to just move out the moment you turn eighteen. I'd say when the child is financially and mentally stable.
Blastoise
Member
(01-12-2017, 11:04 AM)
Blastoise's Avatar
chuck them in boarding school

give them a handshake on their 18th birthday
zoukka
Member
(01-12-2017, 11:04 AM)
zoukka's Avatar

Originally Posted by GrizzleBoy

It's so stupid and I don't understand why people don't set themselves up for their futures first before jumping out into the wild. Well I suppose it's just social pressure.

It's also about personal freedom and independence.

I would never trade my 18-25 life to any amount of money if it meant I spent that time living with my parents.
hodgy100
Member
(01-12-2017, 11:05 AM)
hodgy100's Avatar

Originally Posted by John Rabbit

As someone who moved out upon finding a full-time job, I'd highly recommend you stay with your parents until you have enough saved to buy (not rent). It's easy to get stuck in the "rental cycle" wherein your rent steadily rises every year, and your ability to save to move out and buy dwindles as a result. I'm just now starting to climb out of it at 33.

it depends on the situation really. if you work in the area or nearby or have a car so you can travel a bit then yeah id recommend staying with your parents and saving up to buy. But if you have to go a long way to your job and dont have a car then i'd recommend renting. Me moving out so i could live closer to my job made my quality of life so much better commuting via train wasted a lot of time and money. getting my own place is only a little more expensive once i considered travel costs & board.
Ilive1up
Member
(01-12-2017, 11:08 AM)
Ilive1up's Avatar
I moved out at 27 and I'm happy I did. Saved a lot of $$$
Sunster
Member
(01-12-2017, 11:08 AM)
Sunster's Avatar
My wife wants them all (3 future kids) to stay with us forever. I'm fine with them leaving whenever they are ready.
highrider
Member
(01-12-2017, 11:10 AM)
highrider's Avatar

Originally Posted by Ban Puncher

I am now imagining an American parent kicking their child who has just turned 18 out of the house, still wearing a party hat and with a plate of birthday cake in hand, screaming "BOOTSTRAPS!!" and then slamming the door shut behind them.

I don't understand the mentality here. It's like, why did you have a kid if you just look at it as an albatross that you'll be saddled with for 18 years that you can't wait to kick out?
Zombine
Member
(01-12-2017, 11:20 AM)
Zombine's Avatar
lightly encourage them to experience life on their own with a friend or two if your child has expressed a desire for independence. Welcome them back if it falls through, but provide medium to light parental duties while they are out to keep them afloat while they develop that independence.

What parents need to understand (especially if you have multiple children) is that this isn't a "one method works best" deal. You might have a child that wants to move out immediately, a child that needs home support during schooling, a kid who might be down on their luck, etc. You should prepare to have your children for much longer than 18, but do what it takes to make sure that they are financially secure and independent so when you are gone or incapable of helping them that they can help themselves.

I know a gentleman who is a wonderful guy who still has a child that lives at home in his 30s. While I do believe that their relationship is exploitative to a degree, he has expressed no dissatisfaction having his son at home and appreciates the company.
Last edited by Zombine; 01-12-2017 at 11:22 AM.
Triteon
Member
(01-12-2017, 11:25 AM)
Triteon's Avatar

Originally Posted by GrizzleBoy

Just imagine how much money MILLIONS upon MILLIONS of people waste paying half their salaries in rent, when they haven't even save a deposit for their own house, and will never be able to, because they're paying half their salaries in rent.

It's so stupid and I don't understand why people don't set themselves up for their futures first before jumping out into the wild. Well I suppose it's just social pressure.

There is more to life than money. Your not getting your 20s back and jumping into the wild is what youth is for. Its not just societal pressure
Jake.
Member
(01-12-2017, 11:29 AM)
Jake.'s Avatar
i'm 29 and moved out at 22. generally speaking, i've always thought anyone still living with their parents past 26 or so is mad weird (unless they are unable to look after themselves, e.g. disability). i have a colleague who is 39 and never left home. whatever floats your boat.
OléGunner
Member
(01-12-2017, 11:35 AM)
OléGunner's Avatar

Originally Posted by Ilive1up

I moved out at 27 and I'm happy I did. Saved a lot of $$$

I'm 27 now too and plan to try move out this year.
Problem is rent is a motherfucker in my central city and I've only had a job for a year and a bit after completing my Masters.

Will admit I fucking spend a lot of my pay cheque on stupid shit like drinking, smoking, video games, helping out friends and other general fuckery which I'm tryna cut back on.

Also not being able to have a smash with my girl anytime I want is grating on me lol.

Originally Posted by Jake.

i'm 29 and moved out at 22. generally speaking, i've always thought anyone still living with their parents past 26 or so is mad weird (unless they are unable to look after themselves, e.g. disability). i have a colleague who is 39 and never left home. whatever floats your boat.

Agree with this.
I feel like a piece of shit still living with my parents.

Half my freind circle is in similar position.
crazy monkey
holds a masters in liberal arts
(01-12-2017, 11:39 AM)
crazy monkey's Avatar
When they want to. I am fine having big family. Love big dinners and fun times.
Sunster
Member
(01-12-2017, 11:39 AM)
Sunster's Avatar

Originally Posted by OléGunner

I'm 27 now too and plan to try move out this year.
Problem is rent is a motherfucker in my central city and I've only had a job for a year and a bit after completing my Masters.

Will admit I fucking spend a lot of my pay cheque on stupid shit like drinking, smoking, video games, helping out friends and other general fuckery which I'm tryna cut back on.

Also not being able to have a smash with my girl anytime I want is grating on me lol.



Agree with this.
I feel like a piece of shit still living with my parents.


Half my freind circle is in similar position.

must be an American thing.
SeanR1221
Member
(01-12-2017, 11:41 AM)
SeanR1221's Avatar
I moved out the week after graduating college. Did my time in a shitty apartment while juggling grad school and work.

Worst two years of my life but I'm extremely grateful I did. I was taking classes full time, researching (for free) for 10 hours a week and working every evening on top of it. Id usually go to bed around 2 and wake up at 6. Makes the rest of my life seem like easy mode.
Chaos2Frozen
Banned
(01-12-2017, 11:42 AM)

Originally Posted by Laughing Banana

In my country, Indonesia, there is no stigma whatsoever for people who stayed with their folks even when they're 20, 30, 40, whatever. In fact, living with your folks together with your own wife/husband is a normal thing to do here.

It's common for us Asians, kicking out your children is more of a western mentality.
Ingeniero
Member
(01-12-2017, 11:43 AM)
Ingeniero's Avatar
24 tops.
zoukka
Member
(01-12-2017, 11:43 AM)
zoukka's Avatar

Originally Posted by Sunster

must be an American thing.

No it's also a northern europe thing.
OléGunner
Member
(01-12-2017, 11:47 AM)
OléGunner's Avatar

Originally Posted by Sunster

must be an American thing.

Funnily enough I'm actually from Africa where living with your parents for a long while is not really frowned upon.
But shit, growing up upper middle class, I really feel like I should've made progress to be the hell outta there by now.

FWIW my parents do not think I'm ready to move out even though I've done uni abroad for like 5 years lol.
Sunster
Member
(01-12-2017, 11:47 AM)
Sunster's Avatar

Originally Posted by zoukka

No it's also a northern europe thing.

huh. then must be a western culture thing.
Gallbaro
Member
(01-12-2017, 11:50 AM)
Gallbaro's Avatar
18. 7 more years!
SliceSabre
Catgirls in skimpy clothes aren't sexual, it's their made up MMO culture
(01-12-2017, 11:50 AM)
SliceSabre's Avatar
As someone who lived with his folk until he was nearly 25 I know I would be super generous towards my kids if I ever had any.

I'd feel like a complete ass if I tried to put them out when they weren't ready unless they were shitty kids.
Miles Quaritch
lemme stick dat Red Ring
(01-12-2017, 11:53 AM)
Miles Quaritch's Avatar

Originally Posted by Sunster

huh. then must be a western culture thing.

Individualistic society coupled with an unrealistic view of the world at it currently is.

Even the people saying they moved out ten/fifteen years ago don't realise how much things have changed so they too parrot shit like "I did it so why can't you, you're just scared/lazy"
rickyson1
Member
(01-12-2017, 11:54 AM)
depends on a lot of things

i'm of the opinion that if you want to set a specific age just for the sake of it and are counting down the days towards it then you probably shouldn't have had kids to begin with

one of many reasons I don't plan to myself
Last edited by rickyson1; 01-12-2017 at 11:57 AM.
H.Protagonist
XSEED
(01-12-2017, 11:59 AM)
H.Protagonist's Avatar

Originally Posted by OléGunner

I'm 27 now too and plan to try move out this year.
Problem is rent is a motherfucker in my central city and I've only had a job for a year and a bit after completing my Masters.

Will admit I fucking spend a lot of my pay cheque on stupid shit like drinking, smoking, video games, helping out friends and other general fuckery which I'm tryna cut back on.

Also not being able to have a smash with my girl anytime I want is grating on me lol.



Agree with this.
I feel like a piece of shit still living with my parents.

Half my freind circle is in similar position.

While I agree with giving the kids some support up until a point, what you've painted here is basically why I think many people still subscribe to an age limit for when the kids should go. Yes, some are studying, yes, the market isn't fantastic, but for many it seems to be a reluctance to embark on any hardship (roommates or a smaller place, not eating out as much, not buying things you want, etc.) that keeps more kids at home rather than this noble idea of saving for a house or paying off debt. If everyone's happy with the set-up, it doesn't really matter in the end, I suppose, but it's no surprise that many are more inclined to set a fixed limit (I'm just saying this in a general sense, not for you specifically).
Terrorblot
Member
(01-12-2017, 12:00 PM)
Terrorblot's Avatar
So I'm wondering what people think of this. I was a horrible student and dropped out of highschool, went to night school, then community college, then university. I graduated at 24 years old. I have my bachelors now which I never really expected would happen (always assumed I'd end up in a ditch or something.) but of course now I have a bunch of debt and I'm not in a job in the field I graduated in (I have a degree in Illustration, I work as a secretary at a hospital).

My mom made a sort of nebulous deal with me that she'd cosign all the loans and that she'd pay for what she could, which might be all of it or might not. When I graduated I immediately moved into an apartment with friends, then another apartment with other friends, couple years go by and my mom has basically been paying my student loans and I've been mostly independent otherwise. My lease is up in August, and my mom is already trying to get me to move back home when the lease is up. I think she's starting to get overwhelmed with doing the house chores and taking care of the dog on her own and is also lonely, and of course the added income of me paying her rent (what really would be my student loan payments) would help financially. So, I'm 27 now. Should I be embarrassed about moving back home?
Last edited by Terrorblot; 01-12-2017 at 12:02 PM.
PulseONE
Member
(01-12-2017, 12:04 PM)
PulseONE's Avatar
In my country, since its quite small (and expensive) most people don't move out till their 30s, others simply stay moved in, or build a house nearby. My neighbors built a second building for their son and his wife in their same yard when he got married.

Its actually slightly unusual to find someone in their 20s living alone down here, aside from people going to University.

I never really understood the culture of if you've not moved out by 25 you're a loser :\
Last edited by PulseONE; 01-12-2017 at 12:11 PM.
Relix
he's Virgin Tight™
(01-12-2017, 12:06 PM)
Relix's Avatar
25 or around is a great age. Anything after that is... Ok you have to do something. I think 24 could be perfect for college students with promising careers (doctors, programmers, lawyers, some engineers, etc) while 26 or 27 should be enough for those with other careers to find their footing in today's market. If you are 30 and living with your parents... I don't know what to say. Good luck?
OléGunner
Member
(01-12-2017, 12:11 PM)
OléGunner's Avatar

Originally Posted by H.Protagonist

While I agree with giving the kids some support up until a point, what you've painted here is basically why I think many people still subscribe to an age limit for when the kids should go. Yes, some are studying, yes, the market isn't fantastic, but for many it seems to be a reluctance to embark on any hardship (roommates or a smaller place, not eating out as much, not buying things you want, etc.) that keeps more kids at home rather than this noble idea of saving for a house or paying off debt. If everyone's happy with the set-up, it doesn't really matter in the end, I suppose, but it's no surprise that many are more inclined to set a fixed limit (I'm just saying this in a general sense, not for you specifically).

Yeah I'm with you.
Some people are just comfy at home with their parentals but if everyone is fine with it like you said it doesn't really matter imo.

Hell some cultures like mine don't kick a fuss one way or the other.

In my case, I think about the lifestyle mega downgrade but it's reached the point where I'll soon take a shoe box rather than stay at home haha.

This year is my limit.

Thread Tools