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Chozoman
Junior Member
(01-11-2017, 10:38 PM)
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IMHO, multi-generation homes are not only a great thing, but will become more and more common as the ability to support a household on a single or double income becomes more difficult.

My kids can live with me forever if they like. Family generations should strive to support each other, not fragment themselves and struggle alone.

My 2 cents.
Darth Karja
Member
(01-11-2017, 10:38 PM)
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If they are going to school they can stay. If not I'll give my kids one year after highschool.
FairyD
(01-11-2017, 10:40 PM)
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I moved out at 32.

Kids should move when they're ready mentally and financially.
samoscratch
Member
(01-11-2017, 10:40 PM)
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Originally Posted by Kyne

Whenever they are ready/you're sick of them. Times have changed.

.
grimmiq
Member
(01-11-2017, 10:40 PM)
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I moved out when I was 20, it was hell with a shit job, rent/bills was about 70%-80% of my income, ate poorly, social life went down the toilet. Moved back in and saved money while I worked part time and went back to study. Moved out again around 25 and it was a lot better with stable employment.

I guess now I'm technically back, mother had a fucked up year developing Crohn's disease, having a heart attack, and a long term injury requiring her ankle joints to be fused. Father seriously messed up his shoulder requiring surgery (He's a builder, so fairly important) and lost around 30% strength in his dominant arm. Not in the same house though, they subdivided their block and built a 2nd house, so I rent that out relatively cheap while doing pretty much everything that involves physical effort (lawn, repairs, odd day off here and there working for my dad).

So from personal experience, whenever they're able to financially support themselves and can live in a way that won't compromise their physical/mental health. Had I not rushed to get out at 20, I could have probably moved out comfortably at 23-24.
Marow
Member
(01-11-2017, 10:41 PM)
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I see no reason to put an arbitrary limit such as age. I personally moved out for university when I was 21 which worked well for me. During the gap I tried out various online classes plus was allowed to further mature and come into my own. In addition, I managed to find an apartment instead of a shared housing which - however privileged it sounds - is what I want as I've found shared utterly miserable. Depending on the circumstances, I might've stayed a bit longer just in order to ensure just a proper apartment (while naturally working).

Frankly, when I see people throw their kids out ASAP I'm actually scared. I can't see why one would do that considering how said kid have been raised for the past 18 years. Like, why have a kid in the first place? Personally, though, I might not even take any rent if my own would need to stay longer - after all, I didn't before, so why now? As for moving out, I would consider it if it's clear it has become a parasitic relationship or if there are certain behaviors included (drugs or violence mainly). Though in the latter, I would also ensure to support and be there, meaning that there's no clear-cut answer.
thebeeks
Member
(01-11-2017, 10:41 PM)
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When they have the financial stability to do so.

The whole "turn 18 and move out" isn't much of a thing anymore, unless you want to tack on "...and then move back when they're out of college and looking for a job" to the end.
Lukas Japonicus
Member
(01-11-2017, 10:42 PM)
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Whenever they're financially able to...and/or when they want to.

Putting arbitrary numbers on when people should do X thing is stupid, but we do seem to love doing it for some reason.
Waikis
Member
(01-11-2017, 10:42 PM)
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When they can afford to buy a house. Why pay rent when you can save up so much money by staying with the parents.
Koyuga
Member
(01-11-2017, 10:42 PM)
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When they're ready. This whole "gotta leave the nest by 18-20" shit is stupid as hell, not to mention very unrealistic in todays job and housing markets.
v1lla21
Member
(01-11-2017, 10:42 PM)
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Forcing someone out is stupid, especially setting an age. Now if they are just lazy and don't do shit that's a different story. People should move out when they can afford it.
Zee-Row
I'm a HUGE Nickelback fan!

'Cause we all just wanna be big rockstars And live in hilltop houses driving fifteen cars
(01-11-2017, 10:42 PM)
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I have a friend that owned his own house here in the States and then ended up getting married to a Japanese woman. Now he lives in Japan with her and her parents.
Kayo Police
Member
(01-11-2017, 10:42 PM)
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Originally Posted by _Nemo

When you can afford to. In this day and age of sky rocketing cost of living, setting an age limit is stupid.

This. I will never voluntarily kick out my child. Life is hard. I'm not going to make it even harder.
loaf of bread
Member
(01-11-2017, 10:43 PM)
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Originally Posted by The Lamonster

18-23 min/max IMO

Thats ridiculous in 2016

These threads with people saying people should move out by like 21 are ridiculous considering in a ton of countries around the world its standard for people to not move out until late 20s.
Quonny
Member
(01-11-2017, 10:44 PM)
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Age doesn't matter as long as they have a plan/goal.

If my kid is done at 24 from college but comes home to work and save for a house, they can stay. If my kid is 20 and has no plans or no future goals, they either need to pay or gots ta go.
Tony Redgrave
Member
(01-11-2017, 10:44 PM)
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Depends on family, living place, economic independence etc.

Not everyone enjoys a well-structured family situation with young, healthy parents in a good economic position for starters. Generalizations are mostly useless IMO.
Megalosaro
Member
(01-11-2017, 10:45 PM)
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I was 26 when I moved out. I'm 29 now.

My parents want me to move back
Drensch
Member
(01-11-2017, 10:45 PM)
When they're ready. It's not worth debt and financial issues for "freedom".
tearsofash
Member
(01-11-2017, 10:48 PM)
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I was kicked out the day after graduation from hs. They sold the house already...so probably I will try to be a little more lenient than that.
KillGore
Member
(01-11-2017, 10:48 PM)
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18-23? What is this, the 1980s? That's not a thing anymore
Soapbox Killer
Grand Nagus
(01-11-2017, 10:49 PM)
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17 (which is this year for one of my 5) and take another kid with you when you leave.

Real answer: I do not expect any of my children to be living with me after the age of 19, regardless of school or work. Me and my brother who has 4 kids of his own bought a dirt cheap house and rehabed it for our kids to be able to move out.
Azerare
Member
(01-11-2017, 10:50 PM)
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Originally Posted by Kyne

Whenever they are ready/you're sick of them. Times have changed.

Really this.
QuicheFontaine
Member
(01-11-2017, 10:50 PM)
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18. They can go into further education, learn a trade or just get a job, but they're an adult at that point and they need to learn to stand on their own two feet.

Heck if all else fails they can join the army!
idlewild_
Member
(01-11-2017, 10:52 PM)
When they can afford to. I moved out at 24 to go to grad school in another city, my sister is living at home while in grad school so she may not move out until her late 20s. Have a few friends that live at home in their late 20s and early 30s as well. I'm an immigrant and a lot of my friends are too; there's no real push from the parents to have us move out since it is pretty common to live in multi-generational households in our home countries. To be honest, I think every person I know who took a job in the same city as their parents after college lived at home for at least a few years.
Bluemongoose
Junior Member
(01-11-2017, 10:52 PM)
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Originally Posted by Weevilone

I have a family member that recently married a dude that was still living with parents in his mid 30's. Craziness.

I am 37 and still live at home. Come at me.
kirblar
Member
(01-11-2017, 10:52 PM)
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Depends entirely where you are living.

In the DC areas and NJ many people don't move out till their 20's because of the high cost of living.
Pagusas
Member
(01-11-2017, 10:54 PM)
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18 if the ability to go straight to college and live on campus is an option. 23 absolute max, and even that is really stretching it to the extreme. I know many southern Illinois friends who joined the military to leave home as they were approaching 23, and they all seem to be happy they did and have lead independent lives and have their own families now in their 30's
cyress8
Member
(01-11-2017, 10:55 PM)
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2-3 years after college. Give them a little time to rest up and hit the ground running looking for a job.
If not pursuing a degree, 21. I'm flexible, but no more than 25 years old.

My Dad kicked all of his boys out as soon as he could, but did help financially when we were in a bind. Learned to how to budget and be thrifty real quick when you were broke a good chunk of the time.
Kickz
Member
(01-11-2017, 10:55 PM)
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Originally Posted by AuthenticM

I think that era is gone. With the economy in the shitter, people are going to move out of their parents' house much later than ever. It's probably going to be this way for decades.

Is the economy still in the shitter?

I maybe in a bubble but from my anecdotes its back to pre-Bush levels
Into the Light
Member
(01-11-2017, 10:55 PM)
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I do not think they are mature enough at 18. At least I wasn't.
Wulfric
Member
(01-11-2017, 10:57 PM)
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confession time: I'm 21 and live with my parents. It's kinda lame, but it works. I go to a university 20 minutes away by car, so spending $600-$700 on rent each month seemed kind of foolish to me. Instead, I was able to buy a car and make an emergency fund.

Somewhat anecdotally, latino kids tend to stay home longer on average. As long as you're working or going to school, I think living with your parents until you're 23 ish sounds pretty reasonable. Cost of living and the job market factors into that equation as well for urban areas.
L4DANathan
Member
(01-11-2017, 10:57 PM)
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I'm 22 and have no real prospects for moving out for at LEAST 2 years. My sister who moved out, is moving back in because she can't afford that shit anymore.
I'm new be nice
Member
(01-11-2017, 10:57 PM)
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I just think we should continue to live and judge everyone as though we are still in the 90s. Move out after high school, graduate university, buy a home before your 30s. Anything less is a failure
Ordinaryundone
Member
(01-11-2017, 10:57 PM)
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I moved out when I was 22, right after finishing school. Technically earlier if you count going away for college to be moving out. Never regretted it for a moment.
Farewell
Member
(01-11-2017, 10:58 PM)
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Originally Posted by Chozoman

IMHO, multi-generation homes are not only a great thing, but will become more and more common as the ability to support a household on a single or double income becomes more difficult.

My kids can live with me forever if they like. Family generations should strive to support each other, not fragment themselves and struggle alone.

My 2 cents.

So many nice posts here, especially this, wish i could quote them all, but too many.

Yeah i agree with move out whenever they are ready or wish to do so.
CSJ
Member
(01-11-2017, 11:00 PM)
32 Living at home, my dad is housebound and can't walk so it works out.
I will never afford to buy at my current pay if I were to rent and or/stay single, I would be stuck in renting hell for the rest of my life. When the cheapest is half or more of your monthly take...

I'm saving though, for what? Nothing in particular, an emergency maybe.
I really want to leave though, I desperately need my own space it's really stressing me out.

28 months of work from literally no money and I'm nowhere near close to being able to put down a deposit, let alone afford anything else after that.
Thelonelykoopa
Member
(01-11-2017, 11:00 PM)
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I would say at least till they can get a good job but I'm bias as I'm still living with my Parents and commuting to college. If I wasn't living with my parents I wouldn't be able to afford going to college so if I was kicked out at eighteen I would most likely would never been able to go to college or at least not till I was in my mid thirties.
Kyuur
Member
(01-11-2017, 11:01 PM)
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Whenever they want, but they should start contributing to the household financially once they become an adult. I personally moved out at 18 and never doubted that choice for a minute.
Annacchi
Member
(01-11-2017, 11:02 PM)
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I moved out a few days after turning 26 because I didn't have enough income to live on my own until then. I didn't feel comfortable living on my own because of that. There's no proper age to move out as everyone has different needs, but I guess the answer is somewhere between 17 and 35.
Kickz
Member
(01-11-2017, 11:02 PM)
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Kinda feel like people quick to kick the kids out are the same ones who will be in the nursing home later wishing for a visit
Steelrain
Member
(01-11-2017, 11:03 PM)
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25 Max. Plenty of time to get started and set up.

If they flat out fail, sure, they can come back. They will try though.
ProtomanNeo
Member
(01-11-2017, 11:03 PM)
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As long as my kid isn't a screw up he has a home. I'd rather him move in with me and stack some dough , and get a leg up in life than pay bills and just survive.
Into the Light
Member
(01-11-2017, 11:04 PM)
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Originally Posted by Chozoman

IMHO, multi-generation homes are not only a great thing, but will become more and more common as the ability to support a household on a single or double income becomes more difficult.

My kids can live with me forever if they like. Family generations should strive to support each other, not fragment themselves and struggle alone.

My 2 cents.

Yeah I'm not a fan of your 18 get out, what is that? Like I said before, staying at home has allowed my brother to attend LAW school, and will graduate next year.
Kayhan
Member
(01-11-2017, 11:04 PM)
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lol being stuck with your kids until they are 30.
Mr Touchdown
Member
(01-11-2017, 11:05 PM)
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I'm 27 and making the leap in the next few months. It's harder to leave than it used to be. Could have moved out sooner, but I got to see the world by the grace of my parents letting me stay for an above average boarding payment. I'm in a financial position now where I can do it on my own, so now is the time.
jax
Banned
(01-11-2017, 11:05 PM)
I moved out when I was 18, but now (10 years later) I miss my parents a lot. I wish I could move back in for a while just to hang out with them.
Gentleman Jack
Member
(01-11-2017, 11:06 PM)
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Originally Posted by Megalosaro

I was 26 when I moved out. I'm 29 now.

My parents want me to move back

remembers your crazy roommate threads

Yeah move back in before he kills you :V
H.Protagonist
XSEED
(01-11-2017, 11:06 PM)
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Originally Posted by cyress8

2-3 years after college. Give them a little time to rest up and hit the ground running looking for a job.
If not pursuing a degree, 21. I'm flexible, but no more than 25 years old.

My Dad kicked all of his boys out as soon as he could, but did help financially when we were in a bind. Learned to how to budget and be thrifty real quick when you were broke a good chunk of the time.

Yeah, I think a mix of independence and support when needed is a good combo. Learned a lot of valuable lessons living on my own and always appreciated/made the most of the leg up when things got shaky.
'77 Shortbox
Member
(01-11-2017, 11:07 PM)
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Between 18 and 20. Any older than that and they best be ready to pay their share of the utilities and a fair rent.
Hoo-doo
Member
(01-11-2017, 11:07 PM)
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18.

Real independence taught me so freaking much about the world and i'm a better person for it.
It gave me a tangible headstart in life compared to the people stuck with their parents until their late 20's. I shudder just to think of it, and I love my parents.

By the way, your kid moving out doesn't mean you can't still support them financially, and i'd pay their tuition to any college/university in a heartbeat. Oh, and my government provides every student out there with money and free public transport country-wide. So they wouldn't be struggling one bit.
Last edited by Hoo-doo; 01-11-2017 at 11:11 PM.

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