• Register
  • TOS
  • Privacy
  • @NeoGAF
  • Like

HP_Wuvcraft
(01-11-2017, 11:07 PM)
HP_Wuvcraft's Avatar

Originally Posted by FairyD

I moved out at 32.

Kids should move when they're ready mentally and financially.

.

I'm 34.

Then again, I'm also autistic.
Bgamer90
Member
(01-11-2017, 11:09 PM)
Bgamer90's Avatar

Originally Posted by Vandiger

When they are financially stable?

This. There is no set age on this. Everyone's different. However, if they have no goals to do this then they need to eventually be booted out.
Zackat
Member
(01-11-2017, 11:12 PM)
Zackat's Avatar
I moved out for a while, then I lost my job. Training in a new field now and should hopefully be able to move back out soon. My parents want me to stay longer than my timeline to save money.
Allforce
Member
(01-11-2017, 11:14 PM)
I'd say 23-24 is about when you should have a grasp of How to Adult™ and live independently, but I really don't think just kicking your kid out if they've lived at home entirely until that age is the best idea. Gotta take some baby steps and learn starting around age 18 IMO. College dorms, apartment sharing with friends, etc.

I don't think I've ever met anyone who just straight up moved out at 18 and bought/rented their own place, alone, and just moved on with their life.
Last edited by Allforce; 01-11-2017 at 11:16 PM.
MissDeviling
Member
(01-11-2017, 11:15 PM)
MissDeviling's Avatar
Why is there even a "should"? Family is family, and I know my parents wouldn't mind if I lived with them forever, so long as I can also function as an adult and help with paying the bills. Not only am I worried about them financially as they get older, I also want to be the one to take care of them when they become elderly. I also love my mother's cooking and spending time with her at home. My parents always stay at my brother's place when they're in Hong Kong, which can be for months at a time. My brother is also very attached to them and doesn't want them living separately. He is a fully function adult.

The stigma about family living together after some age limit is ridiculous. I am not a pest to my parents. My parents are not pests to me. Just do your part for the family and there's no reason for the kid to live in shame, and also no reason for the parents to have to kick their child out.
Autumn Wind
Member
(01-11-2017, 11:17 PM)
Autumn Wind's Avatar
There is no max age. However parents should push to have their kids work as soon as possible be it 14-16 and charge rent. The problem becomes if you are paying nothing. You have to contribute something.

In my case, my mom cannot drive so I have to drive her to doctor appointments or run various errands.

I do not want to get married or have children so living with a prospective girlfriend is out because that will eventually come up.
karasu
Likes his fat guys jiggly
(01-11-2017, 11:18 PM)
karasu's Avatar
When I have kids they can stay with me forever. Save that money, kid. It will come in handy when you get marries or have kids of your own.
BeforeU
Oft hope is born when all is forlorn.
(01-11-2017, 11:18 PM)
BeforeU's Avatar
In my culture, never.
BladeoftheImmortal
Banned
(01-11-2017, 11:20 PM)
BladeoftheImmortal's Avatar

Originally Posted by Kickz

Is the economy still in the shitter?

I maybe in a bubble but from my anecdotes its back to pre-Bush levels

For who, though?
Miletius
Member
(01-11-2017, 11:21 PM)
Miletius's Avatar
I wouldn't pressure my kids to move out as long as they were actually working towards something that would make them happy and financially independent in the long run. And I say this as somebody who moved out when he was 18. Moving out at that age helped me but it also hindered me in a lot of ways. Sure, living frugally taught me a lot. But it also imprinted on me this a lot of false ideas about adulthood.

Everybody I've met whose been kicked out from a young age (18-20) tends to be from a lower or middle class background. I myself fell into this category. My suspicion is that enforcing norms of kids moving out early ultimately hinders them in the long run. Of course, coddling them too much hinders them as well, but if I want my kid to be financially stable in the long run I think that forcing them to move out before they are ready seems like a perpetuation of a cycle.
djplaeskool
Member
(01-11-2017, 11:21 PM)
djplaeskool's Avatar

Originally Posted by entremet

18? Kids going away to college ain't counting as moving out no matter what you guys think.

Went to college at 17 and haven't lived with my folks since.
Still manage to see them at least three times a year.
-Pyromaniac-
(01-11-2017, 11:21 PM)
-Pyromaniac-'s Avatar
Whenever the fuck they are financially stable/comfortable to do so. I'm middle eastern so this isn't a big deal for us at all.
Lothar
Member
(01-11-2017, 11:21 PM)
Whatever age they want to. But then I moved out at 32. And then felt like I was wasting money afterwards. So moved back in.
Straight Edge
Member
(01-11-2017, 11:22 PM)
Straight Edge's Avatar
According to past threads...
US 18
Europe 35
Asia never
OrlanisWorks
Member
(01-11-2017, 11:23 PM)
OrlanisWorks's Avatar
It's far more important to be financially stable/capable than it is to have that "sense of independence." It's stupid to move out and then soon be on the brink of homelessness.

The job market is still very unkind and is not at all what it had been before the whole shit show that was... 2008? 2007?
Nester99
Member
(01-11-2017, 11:26 PM)
Nester99's Avatar
When you finish school, be it high school or university.

Now is the time to spread your wings and fly little bird.
FoxSpirit
Junior Member
(01-11-2017, 11:28 PM)
FoxSpirit's Avatar

Originally Posted by Straight Edge

According to past threads...
US 18
Europe 35
Asia never

Depends which part of Europe. Like Italy is often until you marry but in Germany it's more like mid 20s on average.
cwmartin
Member
(01-11-2017, 11:28 PM)
cwmartin's Avatar

Originally Posted by BladeoftheImmortal

For who, though?

The majority of the country. Unemployment is the lowest it's been in ten years, GDP and income generation are up from the 'crisis' levels as well. The American economy is doing well.
Last edited by cwmartin; 01-11-2017 at 11:32 PM.
cwmartin
Member
(01-11-2017, 11:30 PM)
cwmartin's Avatar

Originally Posted by OrlanisWorks

It's far more important to be financially stable/capable than it is to have that "sense of independence." It's stupid to move out and then soon be on the brink of homelessness.

The job market is still very unkind and is not at all what it had been before the whole shit show that was... 2008? 2007?

Can you substantiate this? Everyone in our generation (22-30) seems to think it's hard to find jobs and the economy is still struggling. This is not true.

The major problem inhibiting 20s independence is debt, and probably some change it attitudes. There's no right way to move out. It made sense for me at 21, it doesnt for everyone.
Last edited by cwmartin; 01-11-2017 at 11:33 PM.
Thelonelykoopa
Member
(01-11-2017, 11:31 PM)
Thelonelykoopa's Avatar

Originally Posted by Straight Edge

According to past threads...
US 18
Europe 35
Asia never

Which is ridiculous considering how much colleges cost. Hell my yearly college tuition is about the same as my parents make in a year and I'm commuting.
Vladimir Putin
Junior Member
(01-11-2017, 11:32 PM)
Vladimir Putin's Avatar

Originally Posted by djplaeskool

Went to college at 17 and haven't lived with my folks since.
Still manage to see them at least three times a year.

Yeah, I'm surprised people are so dismissive of 18 as an answer... Get loans, go to college, and work to pay bills. It's not a bad thing to stay at home longer, but to laugh it off like it is ridiculous to do it at 18 is silly. Takes hard work
Last edited by Vladimir Putin; 01-11-2017 at 11:35 PM.
Kenstar
Member
(01-11-2017, 11:33 PM)
Kenstar's Avatar
26, I live with my mom and siblings but am on the lease and pay towards rent with my brother (24) as well.

It'd be hard on her if we both left right now as she's been unemployed for a couple of years, living off of retirement money withdrawals minus the big tax hits and renters dont like new tenants with no recent work history

I've got Thousands in the bank saved, a salaried job+Insurance & benefits, a car and a bike, and am ready to go whenever she can make it alone with just the 2 HS age girls.

She's got a Masters in Education, but after not working for 20+ years and a nasty divorce a few years ago losing us the house, she's had to resort to working at supermarkets, online support and a daycare to make ends meet in the rented house we now live in.

My brother moved out for about half a year but had to move back in when his roomates started flaking on rent and he couldn't pay it alone.
highrider
Member
(01-11-2017, 11:37 PM)
highrider's Avatar
My son is 14 and he can stay with me whenever he wants for the rest of my life.
He's a very ambitious kid and I'd always want him on his grind, but to me family should always have your back.

I grew up in an unstable home, and from my teenage years I never felt secure there. Went in the army at 17 just to get out. People romanticize the self made life, and I have respect for those that can do it, but for me it was just a tough, shitty experience early on. I'd rather have a failure to launch kid that was happy.
CrazyIvan1978
Junior Member
(01-11-2017, 11:42 PM)
CrazyIvan1978's Avatar
As soon as he wants to, no later than 18, can't wait
javac
Member
(01-11-2017, 11:46 PM)
javac's Avatar

Originally Posted by Hoo-doo

It gave me a tangible headstart in life compared to the people stuck with their parents until their late 20's. I shudder just to think of it, and I love my parents.

I've never really understood this whole "Head Start" thing, head start at what? It's not a race, we're all living at our own pace and on our own paths, and although we all may share common goals (getting fat stacks), ultimately we live our own lives. There's people out there that achieved what you have in a fraction of the time and many whom will take longer, some may never achieve what you have but they too will achieve things you won't either. Life is all about the journey not the destination. Be proud of your Independence and the speed at which you achieved it, but don't feel as if you're ahead of others.
MikeDip
God bless all my old friends/And god bless me too, why pretend?
(01-11-2017, 11:46 PM)
MikeDip's Avatar

Originally Posted by Chozoman

IMHO, multi-generation homes are not only a great thing, but will become more and more common as the ability to support a household on a single or double income becomes more difficult.

My kids can live with me forever if they like. Family generations should strive to support each other, not fragment themselves and struggle alone.

My 2 cents.

Your advice is worth much more than 2 cents. Live together die alone, great words to live by.
BstnRich
Junior Member
(01-11-2017, 11:47 PM)
BstnRich's Avatar
When they are ready and the world permits it.

You're the one who dragged them into this hell. At least provide some shelter.
killer rin
Member
(01-11-2017, 11:48 PM)
killer rin's Avatar
When you can afford to. That said, you better be helping out your parents if you stay past 20
John Rabbit
Member
(01-11-2017, 11:49 PM)
John Rabbit's Avatar
I moved out initially at 22. Lived with my parents on and off between 23 and 29, the last time was about a year due to job loss and having to break my lease before I had zero money left. They never pressured me to leave.
Ogodei
Member
(01-11-2017, 11:50 PM)
Ogodei's Avatar
First job that can support an independent living arrangement, which might be at 18 if they apprentice into a good trade quickly, or might not be until 30.

The only stipulation of living with the parents should be that you're making progress towards getting what you need to get that job that you need to move out.
PaulloDEC
Member
(01-11-2017, 11:50 PM)
PaulloDEC's Avatar
I'm 28 and I'll be looking to buy a place in a years time.

I definitely could've moved out years ago, but on my wage I doubt I'd ever have been able to afford to own a home if I had. As it is, the place I buy won't be anything flash.

I'm not thrilled to still be living at home from a personal-development standpoint, but this was the only way I could see to ever own my own home without landing myself in crippling debt for the rest of my life. I'd want to provide my kids with the same flexibility and freedom my parents offered me.
Hyun Sai
Member
(01-11-2017, 11:51 PM)
Hyun Sai's Avatar
I moved out at around 30 when I got enough savings to buy my house. No regrets, never would have wasted money on a rent.
MikeDip
God bless all my old friends/And god bless me too, why pretend?
(01-11-2017, 11:54 PM)
MikeDip's Avatar
Keep the money in the family people. Stop throwing things away for no reason.

Having these arbitrary numbers is so silly. Why 23 over 22? Such a silly answer.
Kyrios
Member
(01-11-2017, 11:54 PM)
Kyrios's Avatar
Whenever they can financially.

My dad always says that he lets me stay rent free because he wants me to actually save up for a place of my own and there being no chance for me to come back lmao

The man wants his own game room.
Jotaka
Member
(01-11-2017, 11:58 PM)
Jotaka's Avatar
When they feel like to do so... Their children didn't ask to be born.. now they need to deal with them lol

I left at 23y
ArjanN
Member
(01-11-2017, 11:59 PM)
ArjanN's Avatar

Originally Posted by How About No

The real question is when do the parents move out to a nursing home

Finally someone asking the real questons.
always crazy bacon
Member
(01-12-2017, 12:02 AM)
always crazy bacon's Avatar
Mid 20's, share with other people if they can't afford it solo. Life skill building experiences. My youngest brother was so coddled up to his 30s that I don't think he can function on his own.
Mawnster
Member
(01-12-2017, 12:03 AM)
Mawnster's Avatar
I moved out from Spain to the UK when I was 18-19 and lasted less than a year, failing miserably. Had to come back home. Went back to studying and now I'm currently trying to find a decent job to see if I can move out again. I'm 23 now.

It's not a matter of when we should leave our parents house. It's a matter of whether we're able to or not. It's difficult.
StalkerUKCG
Member
(01-12-2017, 12:04 AM)
StalkerUKCG's Avatar
Lived virtually on my own since I was 14. Lived entirely on my own since I was 17.

I like to think being trust into independence makes kids adapt better life skills
-Stranger-
Junior Member
(01-12-2017, 12:04 AM)
-Stranger-'s Avatar
I moved out at 18
However I'd be cool with my daughter's staying at home until 22-23 if they needed to.
panama chief
Member
(01-12-2017, 12:06 AM)
panama chief's Avatar
Moved out in my early 20s. But divorce, bad credit, car note, and single parenting has me stuck at my moms for 3 years now. I'm 34. I need to get out of here.
Hypron
Member
(01-12-2017, 12:07 AM)
Hypron's Avatar

Originally Posted by Vandiger

When they are financially stable?

Yep. Ideally that would happen after finishing school/college (if the kids end up going to college), since it's probably better for everyone involved, and I think that as a parent you should try to help your child get their shit sorted by that time... But if they need a couple more years before they can move out then so be it. You don't want to fuck them over.

And even then, if the parents are all right with their kids staying home then why not. I know a couple of guys that still live with their parents even though they could very easily afford their own place (they have decent engineering jobs), but prefer to stay home for saving money and/or for convenience sake. They pay a bit of board though.

Personally I moved out at 22 when I started my PhD. I finally pay for everything myself and it feels great to be in total control of what I'm doing.
Last edited by Hypron; 01-12-2017 at 12:13 AM.
Daingurse
Member
(01-12-2017, 12:08 AM)
Daingurse's Avatar
When they can I guess. I don't know what the ideal age is. I'm 26, going on 27 this year, and I'm still at home. I don't really care about the stigma anymore. I work and contribute financially, and honestly like being around my family. I also have a ton of issues, so I benefit from having a strong family support system.
Saitama
Member
(01-12-2017, 12:09 AM)
Saitama's Avatar
I'm 22 and if I had a full time job i'd consider finding myself a small apartment some where, but until then I'll gladly suck it up and live with my parents.
GamerJM
Member
(01-12-2017, 12:14 AM)
GamerJM's Avatar
When they want to

I don't plan on moving out when I'm financially stable enough to just because I don't want to. I might not ever want to.
Oscar
Member
(01-12-2017, 12:16 AM)
Oscar's Avatar
I'm Mexican-American, my parents told me I could stick around for as long as I wanted, as long as I wasn't just being a bum (I went to school full time and worked part time). I appreciated that of them and never felt like a burden/no longer wanted there.

I've noticed that all of my non Hispanic friends (including my white fiancée) got the boot at 18 no matter what.

I'm a father now, and I wouldn't mind my kid(s) sticking around until they're ready to leave the nest like my folks did with me.
Dysun
Member
(01-12-2017, 12:17 AM)
Dysun's Avatar
They should move out when they are financially secure and won't have to live week to week or fall into debt. The age doesn't matter
John Rabbit
Member
(01-12-2017, 12:19 AM)
John Rabbit's Avatar

Originally Posted by Saitama

I'm 22 and if I had a full time job i'd consider finding myself a small apartment some where, but until then I'll gladly suck it up and live with my parents.

As someone who moved out upon finding a full-time job, I'd highly recommend you stay with your parents until you have enough saved to buy (not rent). It's easy to get stuck in the "rental cycle" wherein your rent steadily rises every year, and your ability to save to move out and buy dwindles as a result. I'm just now starting to climb out of it at 33.
SoulUnison
Member
(01-12-2017, 12:21 AM)
SoulUnison's Avatar
I'm 28 and still at "home."
My remaining parent is 92 and needed to be with family members who could watch after her full-time, since nobody wanted her to be put "in a home," so I sort of pre-inherited the family house.
Moved into the master bedroom, turned my old room into a study...

It's kind of emotionally draining living here, though.
Too many memories and I'm basically bound to this location until she passes on, which is inherently dark.
Soapbox Killer
Grand Nagus
(01-12-2017, 12:29 AM)
Soapbox Killer's Avatar
I want to walk around naked. When shit breaks, I know who did it. Plus leaving the nest young and seeing the world through your own eyes is awesome.

I can't imagine being 20 plus and still living at home. I wanna drink beer and have reckless sex on the couch and not have to keep quiet about it. Where I'm from there are certain things you don't do at your parents home. I'm old school.

Thread Tools