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SOLDIER
Member
(03-20-2017, 01:37 PM)
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For years I've gotten the advice that you should "do what you love" when it comes to finding a long-term career. As someone who loves videogames, that statement has always been a paradox for me.

Any time I've inquired about what it would be like working a job that has to do with videogames, it always sounds like a low-paying, high-stress nightmare. People who work on game development seem forced to work gruelling long hours with little job security. Gamestop employees have to resort to scummy tactics to round up pre-order numbers to fill out an arbitrary "circle of life" quota.

Streaming seems like the potential dream job, at least when viewed through the Super Best Friends and other successful LP'ers: set your own hours, play games all day while having drunken discussions about wrestling and anime with your friends, never leave the house....problem is your source of income lives and dies on your subscriber count, and the pressure to keep entertaining plus juggle a dozen games at a time can lead to all sorts of health problems (evidiced by one of their mainstays having to quit the channel).

So is there any videogame-related job that isn't a soul-crushing nightmare? At the end of the day, salary and job security are more important to me than having the "priviledge" of having a job related to my favorite hobby. I'm just wondering if there's actually reasonable work to be found related to videogames, even if not directly.

About the only success I've personally achieved is freelance reviews. Been doing it for almost a decade, but I never have gotten paid for it besides keeping the games I review (which is a good enough incentive for me).
CalamityPixel
Member
(03-20-2017, 01:41 PM)
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They are all soul crushing. It's the downside of this still fairly new industry, no matter the job you need to be the very best, up to date on tech and have a constant stream of good content. That applies whether you are a Designer, Reviewer, Animator, Programmer ect
Pepin
Junior Member
(03-20-2017, 01:42 PM)
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Just handed in my notice at an outlet in London because of this - the job had me doing 12-hour days, leaving me with little free time and often taking work home with me. The salary was unreasonable in London & I had to commute to the office for 2 hours each way in order to afford rent.

The beat was a mix of streaming, video editing and news coverage. I've quit to become a freelancer, as that way I can focus on exactly what I want to do (writing/features) and not really have to tackle other areas I'm not comfortable with (streaming, video editing).

So, to answer your question: for me, freelance seems to be the only way of balancing a videogames-based job and my actual happiness and mental well-being. I'm also likely to earn more money living this way too.
Arkam
(03-20-2017, 01:47 PM)
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Based on my experience in the games industry, if you truly want to have a long term career in games you first have to figure out what you enjoy doing. Then once you discover something you are passionate about you will be able to find a job that allows you to do it, In my experience that is the only way to be happy in this industry. When you are doing something that makes you happy those bouts of long hours, lower pay, etc will be greatly muted.

When I was working as a designer I loved going to work. When I shifted to live production I liked going to work (at first). Now I manage a development team... and want to punch my self in the face everyday. While members of my team who are passionate about programming and system architecture come to work everyday with a massive smile on their face. All my environment and character artist friends are all in the same boat. They cant believe they get paid to work on 3D models all day.
Last edited by Arkam; 03-20-2017 at 02:07 PM. Reason: the English language escapes me some times
Shadowhelper
Member
(03-20-2017, 01:53 PM)
Videogame related job is a very vague thing.

Videogames media? Or development and marketing? Mobile or AAA? Like in any industry the jobs can be exploitative, but many times they are not. It's pretty nuanced, but the AAA industry is well known for working their employees pretty hard.

I think the culture at mobile games and app companies, the ones that exist, is quite different, though. Dunno, pretty sure many AAA games companies are great to work at.

Games media, is a weird beast. People either like looking and listening to you, or they don't. You gotta be willing to put yourself out there.
Piers
Member
(03-20-2017, 01:58 PM)
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Any job in a field that's driven by passion is going to have extreme competition, on top of being exploited by management. The reason service-sector jobs like plumbing, electrician and so on get reasonable pay and hours is because they're actually needed.
HandsomeCharles
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(03-20-2017, 02:28 PM)
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The tales of low pay and horrendous hours certainly aren't an exaggeration, but they're also not universally applicable.

For example, I've been in the industry for about 4 years now, and in that time I've only done about 2-3 months of crunch total, whilst working on a number of different projects. However, I have friends (at other studios) who are in perpetual crunch, and then I have others who do none what so ever.

The "crunch" is largely dependent on your position. For example, if you are a "Gameplay scripter/programmer" then you're likely to be effected by crunch as deadlines approach for release, whereas if you're a "tools programmer" then it could be the case that your specific responsibilities don't require you to be crunching. Every studio will be different, you just need to find out which ones suit you best.

You then have other jobs that aren't necessarily "development", but are still part of the industry. Marketing, PR, Community support etc. These guys all contribute to the overall package but don't necessarily work on the games themselves.

As for pay, again, thats going to vary from studio to studio. I think one of the things that should probably be explained is that whilst on the whole the pay is lower than equivalent jobs in non-game related fields, it is not necessarily low in the grand scheme of things. In some cases it will be (Sorry QA guys), but if you're in a role that requires some kind of degree to meet the minimum requirements you're going to be paid a decent enough amount.

It's one of these things you need to really think about. What is the value of doing something you love? I have had this thought myself as I see my friends (Who don't work in the industry) starting to buy property and going on nice holidays. I certainly don't have it bad, but I'm probably a few years out from being able to afford that kind of thing. After some soul-searching though, I've decided to stay. It's what I wanted to do all my life, and I worked hard to get here. I don't have any intention of giving up my dreams just yet.
Hitlersaurus Christ
Member
(03-20-2017, 02:30 PM)
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Creative director. Good luck getting there.
Mephala
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(03-20-2017, 02:32 PM)
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How about casual reviews or streaming related stuff? You could pick some niches or take fan suggestions on what kind of content maybe.
Fhtagn
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(03-20-2017, 02:37 PM)
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This can take a long time to figure out, took me till my late 20s actually, but it's better to do what one loves when it's the verb you love and not the subject.

I love music but I got advice from a friend who was deep in the industry to stay out of it. I eventually found a job I really like where my personality and the tasks at hand align really well even if the subject/focus of the work is mostly boring.

So for example, if you enjoy video editing, there's tons of videos that need editing, they don't have to be about video games. It's the verb that matters more.

(And when the thing you love becomes your job instead of a verb you love, the circumstances of your work can badly affect your enthusiasm for the thing you once loved.)
Kayero
Member
(03-20-2017, 02:38 PM)
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Worked in QA for different companies for more than 6 years now. It can be fun, but it highly depends on the company and if they see QA just as a nuisance.
At the moment I'm a supervisor and it's quite stressful due to a new company structure which led to an incredibly high workload (including taking care of forums) and the salary is still very low. So yeah, currently looking for a new job and as I don't mind occasional crunch time I want to get at least enough money out of it to be able to rent a small flat that isn't absolute shit.

But yeah, as long as you don't expect to get rich working in the industry you can have a great time. Unless your employer sucks.
jrh2
Member
(03-20-2017, 02:38 PM)
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If you've been freelancing for a decade, you should have enough of a portfolio to be able to pitch for some actual paying gigs. Start there and see if it's something you still enjoy.
Corpekata
Member
(03-20-2017, 02:39 PM)
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Sounds like maybe something business/marketing end might be more up your alley.
Joe Shlabotnik
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(03-20-2017, 02:41 PM)
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I think the trap people fall into when they think about "do what you love" is kind of ignoring the "doing" part. You need to love some inherent activity or skill to truly enjoy a job. You might love to "play video games" but only very recently has their been an extremely volatile and narrow way of doing that for a living.

If you love "video games" as a subject, that doesn't necessarily mean there's something you love to do involving it. Do you love to code? Do you love to create graphic art? These are inherent skills to "love" that could be applied toward a subject or hobby you enjoy.

You need to be diligent or lucky enough to find a skill or talent that is enjoyable for you in and of itself.
bosseye
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(03-20-2017, 02:45 PM)
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Originally Posted by Joe Shlabotnik

If you love "video games" as a subject, that doesn't necessarily mean there's something you love to do involving it. Do you love to code? Do you love to create graphic art? These are inherent skills to "love" that could be applied toward a subject or hobby you enjoy.
.

I think this is a great point. Just because you love the process of playing video games, does not mean you would love or even be competent at the processes involved in creating one.
kqedequalsvolvo
Member
(03-20-2017, 02:46 PM)
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If you're talking related to videogames where there's a balance between job security and working with games then one route is potentially via PR/marketing. I've heard some not great things about working for some internal PR teams at game publishers but a lot of creative agencies with a focus on tech take on work related to video games. So for some people it's a nice option as you may get to work on game release campaigns, without the burn-out associated with being 'behind the curtain' with your hobby. As others have rightly said, it's about making sure that you enjoy the day to day tasks of any job, as opposed to just working in proximity to a hobby you really enjoy. Like the saying goes, a lot of people love eating sausage but they don't like seeing it get made.

I used to do freelance PR/marketing for indies to build my portfolio a while back which gave me some idea of what that could be like and I enjoyed it (and work in a non-gaming creative agency now).
Last edited by kqedequalsvolvo; 03-20-2017 at 02:49 PM.
SOLDIER
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(03-20-2017, 02:48 PM)
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Originally Posted by jrh2

If you've been freelancing for a decade, you should have enough of a portfolio to be able to pitch for some actual paying gigs. Start there and see if it's something you still enjoy.

I would love that, if I ever ran into any review job offers worth applying to.

My main resource has been this site here, and 99% of the jobs I see posted are either volunteer-based or "Well we can't pay you NOW, but maybe after 1 million views we can start!".

I like writing. Whether it's an opinion article, review, or original story, it all requires some degree of creativity. If there was a broader field I would love to get into, it would be that (especially if I could work at home).

But again, any job offers I've come across offer a pittance of payment, if even that. But I also might not be looking in the right places, so please continue to educate me.
Antiwhippy
the holder of the trombone
(03-20-2017, 02:52 PM)
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Being a consumer is a much different experience than being a creator.
HandsomeCharles
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(03-20-2017, 02:53 PM)
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Originally Posted by SOLDIER

I would love that, if I ever ran into any review job offers worth applying to.

My main resource has been this site here, and 99% of the jobs I see posted are either volunteer-based or "Well we can't pay you NOW, but maybe after 1 million views we can start!".

I like writing. Whether it's an opinion article, review, or original story, it all requires some degree of creativity. If there was a broader field I would love to get into, it would be that (especially if I could work at home).

But again, any job offers I've come across offer a pittance of payment, if even that. But I also might not be looking in the right places, so please continue to educate me.

https://www.gamesjobsdirect.com
http://jobs.gamesindustry.biz/
http://www.mcvuk.com/

There's some starting points. Also check out the careers pages of studios/publishers as they often list current opportunities.
kqedequalsvolvo
Member
(03-20-2017, 02:58 PM)
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Originally Posted by SOLDIER

I would love that, if I ever ran into any review job offers worth applying to.

My main resource has been this site here, and 99% of the jobs I see posted are either volunteer-based or "Well we can't pay you NOW, but maybe after 1 million views we can start!".

I like writing. Whether it's an opinion article, review, or original story, it all requires some degree of creativity. If there was a broader field I would love to get into, it would be that (especially if I could work at home).

But again, any job offers I've come across offer a pittance of payment, if even that. But I also might not be looking in the right places, so please continue to educate me.

My limited experience of this stuff is that you are far, far more likely to be successful being self-starting and building a portfolio of work rather than straight up applying for jobs within the industry - particularly when so much of it is based on networking and having connections.

There's certainly no massive harm in taking on the kinda jobs like at the site you linked, but I don't think the cost/benefit is there. I think you're far more likely to be successful through doing reviews and articles in your spare time and keeping them on a blog/dedicated website that showcases a portfolio of your written work - and pitching freelance pieces/article concepts to websites you believe are a good fit for you. For example, say there's someone in the industry who's not unreachable who you think would be interesting to interview, linked to a theme in gaming or related to recent news. Pitch the idea to outlets you think would find it interesting, citing the work of other people on the site which you feel best matches the tone/subject matter. If no-one goes for it, write it anyway. Put it on your blog. Submit it to smaller outlets. Print it and put it in a zine and take it to trade shows and expos - just keep building a body of work. Keep tweeting about it. Did a journalist write about a subject you feel you've covered in a different or interesting way? Let them know.

It may not achieve anything financial immediately (or ever) - but you can be guaranteed that any pitching you do for work is going to be given more consideration with 1. a body of work and 2. a proven track record of being self-starting and dedicated. The additional thing is that, beyond it costing you a chunk of your spare time, is that writing for your own portfolio will teach you pretty quickly whether regularly writing about games is something you're happy doing multiple times a week as opposed to the 'idea' of doing so.

This is a PR example but if it's of any encouragement, I met someone who works for a fairly big publisher who got a job pretty much via meeting someone at an event, getting chatting, becoming informal mates and maintaining a review blog. The review blog didn't make any money or garner much attention in itself, but when they asked 'let's see some work', they had the blog as proof of ability.

Bottom line is that there's often a loop with gaming jobs where they require experience OR working for free, but unless you know people in the industry already, you can't get a foot in the door as you've not managed to gain the experience or can't afford to work for free. So make your own experience in your spare time whilst seeing whether it's something you enjoy doing on the regular.
Last edited by kqedequalsvolvo; 03-20-2017 at 03:05 PM.
Lister
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(03-20-2017, 02:59 PM)
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Originally Posted by SOLDIER

I would love that, if I ever ran into any review job offers worth applying to.

My main resource has been this site here, and 99% of the jobs I see posted are either volunteer-based or "Well we can't pay you NOW, but maybe after 1 million views we can start!".

I like writing. Whether it's an opinion article, review, or original story, it all requires some degree of creativity. If there was a broader field I would love to get into, it would be that (especially if I could work at home).

But again, any job offers I've come across offer a pittance of payment, if even that. But I also might not be looking in the right places, so please continue to educate me.

If writing is your thing, then vidoe games writing is probably what you want. I'm not sur eI'd call working retial at gamestop a "Career", and it doesn't sound like you're interested in technical positions.

Unfortunatley I have no idea how to get your foot in the door as a writer for games. I'd suggest looking at places like Obsidian, in Exile, Bethesda etc to see what they're looking for, and asking games writers on AMA onr eddit or whenever they make themselves avaialble to fans like on streams.

My guess is you probably have to be able to show a portofolio and body of work. Creative projects, etc.

Open source is a big way to highlight that on the programming side of thigns, but I wouldn't be surprised if writing can take advanateg of that too. Volunteer for small scale games, elevate their writing and work your way up.

Good luck!
Atomski
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(03-20-2017, 03:00 PM)
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I never really got the whole you enjoy doing something so you should do it as a career enjoying games is nothing like making them.. just how eating food is nothing like being a chef.

Consuming something is completely different than producing something.
LiK
(03-20-2017, 03:02 PM)
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Publisher CEO. Your job to to crush their souls.
Forearm Star
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(03-20-2017, 03:02 PM)
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Originally Posted by SOLDIER

For years I've gotten the advice that you should "do what you love" when it comes to finding a long-term career. As someone who loves videogames, that statement has always been a paradox for me.

Any time I've inquired about what it would be like working a job that has to do with videogames, it always sounds like a low-paying, high-stress nightmare. People who work on game development seem forced to work gruelling long hours with little job security. Gamestop employees have to resort to scummy tactics to round up pre-order numbers to fill out an arbitrary "circle of life" quota.

Streaming seems like the potential dream job, at least when viewed through the Super Best Friends and other successful LP'ers: set your own hours, play games all day while having drunken discussions about wrestling and anime with your friends, never leave the house....problem is your source of income lives and dies on your subscriber count, and the pressure to keep entertaining plus juggle a dozen games at a time can lead to all sorts of health problems (evidiced by one of their mainstays having to quit the channel).

So is there any videogame-related job that isn't a soul-crushing nightmare? At the end of the day, salary and job security are more important to me than having the "priviledge" of having a job related to my favorite hobby. I'm just wondering if there's actually reasonable work to be found related to videogames, even if not directly.

About the only success I've personally achieved is freelance reviews. Been doing it for almost a decade, but I never have gotten paid for it besides keeping the games I review (which is a good enough incentive for me).


Hey now! Gamestop sucks ass but if you want to work there do what I do and just work on day a week and big game releases. I don't care much for my numbers and spend most of my day talking shop with customers and my coworkers. It's honestly the only way to enjoy video game retail.

This place isn't a career move by any means..
stoff
Junior Member
(03-20-2017, 03:04 PM)
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Turn your hobby into your job and it is no longer your hobby, but your job.
Bakercat
Junior Member
(03-20-2017, 03:06 PM)
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I've been going through the same situation. I want my job to be in the video game industry in some fashion. I tried to learn coding, but I didn't really have the skills or passion to continue on the field. I can't go into the design aspect of the jobs because I'm not a hands on artistic person. What I do love is talking about video games and expressing myself in the game industry. Right now I'm currently testing the waters through lets plays and possibly going on the do video game podcasts. It's something I enjoy doing, but can be pretty difficult at times to try and stay entertaing while doing. I'm also going to try a doctoral degree in psychology and one thing I'd like to study on is possible positive effects video games can have on mental illness and mental disabilities. You don't have to be a programmer or a art designer to be in the community, there are many possibilities for jobs in the field, you just have to have the drive to do it imo.
Shotgun Kiss
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(03-20-2017, 03:10 PM)
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If you live near a developer of an MMO or such, Customer/User Support can be OK. I did it at Jagex (developer of RuneScape) for a few years, and some of my friends now do it at Frontier (developer of Elite Dangerous).

The hours are generally shit (it's usually shift work, so you could be working nights/evenings), and the pay usually isn't great, but it certainly wasn't "soul-crushing". A little monotonous at times, but what job isn't? Plus you usually get to work with some cool people.
dmcAxle
Junior Member
(03-20-2017, 03:12 PM)
Working at a game dev company isn't really soul crushing. You just have to avoid the really bad ones (AAAs like EA being the extreme). Most companies have healthy hours.
Jack The Nipper
Can outshoot and shutdown Steph Curry at the local YMCA.
(03-20-2017, 03:14 PM)
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It seems to me the only way its fun is if you are creating the games you want with a team you want without control above you. Having to make a creed or something would seem like a manufacturing job imo

Also, spending 10 or more hours a day would make you feel you don't even want to go home and play games anymore and you would likely always be thinking about the work anyways.
Wireframe
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(03-20-2017, 03:16 PM)
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So glad I just have gaming as a hobby. I think it loses a bit of the magic if it becomes work.
Justin Bailey
------ ------
(03-20-2017, 03:17 PM)
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Think about it more from a trade or skillset that you like doing first.

From your post it sounds like you are more interested in the service-side of things, vs the technology or art side.

With the exception of employing a lot of artists - a video game company is pretty much just like any other company in the tech industry. They have people in software development, project management, accounting, human resources, marketing, etc etc.

But it's the trade that you will be doing on a day-to-day basis, so you need to find some enjoyment from that first - then the fact that you enjoy the end product you are making becomes a bonus.
Two Words
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(03-20-2017, 03:17 PM)
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I can't imagine being a programmer on a video game would be paying badly. Software development jobs typically pay well, so I don't see how they can keep programmers if they aren't competitive with pay.
Kayero
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(03-20-2017, 03:21 PM)
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Originally Posted by Two Words

I can't imagine being a programmer on a video game would be paying badly. Software development jobs typically pay well, so I don't see how they can keep programmers if they aren't competitive with pay.

Most programmers in the industry don't get near as much as they would in software development. Same goes for QA and some (most?) other professions.
The only reason why we're still working on vidya games is because we love them and it's our passion to do so.

That's my experience at least.
captain_skyhawk
Junior Member
(03-20-2017, 03:23 PM)
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Find me a job in any industry that isn't soul crushing. Unless your job requires you to sit at home and do whatever you want I don't think you'll ever find what you are looking for.
dmcAxle
Junior Member
(03-20-2017, 03:24 PM)

Originally Posted by Two Words

I can't imagine being a programmer on a video game would be paying badly. Software development jobs typically pay well, so I don't see how they can keep programmers if they aren't competitive with pay.

Passion. "You're lucky to be working here and doing your dream job"

Though it's only around 20% less. So average salary is still 70-90k (depending on country).
Last edited by dmcAxle; 03-20-2017 at 03:29 PM.
texhnolyze
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(03-20-2017, 03:25 PM)
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Editor/translator, perhaps?

Scipts would be normally done in early to middle stage of development, so maybe you'll get quite a long deadline for tidying things up.
Lister
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(03-20-2017, 03:25 PM)
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Originally Posted by Two Words

I can't imagine being a programmer on a video game would be paying badly. Software development jobs typically pay well, so I don't see how they can keep programmers if they aren't competitive with pay.

It's goign to depend on what you are doing. Engineers working on the complex rendering architecture of the engine, creating and enhancing dev tooling, creating AI and physics systems - I would imagine so, or they could be making better money elsewhere.

But the programmers creating the script that says if player walks over trap apply 30 dmg... probably not as much. Mind you, those guys are probably closer to the actual meat and potatoes of what the game will be - balancing gameplay and actually having the job of making the game fun.
Magic Mushroom
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(03-20-2017, 03:27 PM)
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Originally Posted by texhnolyze

Editor/translator, perhaps?

Scipts would be normally done the middle stage of development, so maybe you'll get quite a long deadline for tidying things up.

As someone working in localisation, I can confirm that this can be a pretty good job. It's still hard work and the deadlines can be insane, but it's fun most of the time and it pays well enough (I work freelance).
jluedtke
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(03-20-2017, 03:39 PM)
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"Video game-related" job is pretty broad, but in my professional career I've worked at the corporate headquarters for two different large retailers, both times in their video games departments (merchandising, inventory, etc.). It keeps me relatively close to the industry, but at the same time keeps my family and I fed and housed. No worries about crushing deadlines, absurd sales goals, or the constant threat of mass layoffs. I'm not creating games or writing about them, but I sometimes get to see some neat stuff before it's released, and get some insight to the business that I otherwise wouldn't.
PaineReign
Junior Member
(03-20-2017, 03:44 PM)
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Well, it doesn't sound like you are particularly interested in game development, but more gaming culture. Those are, understandably, tougher jobs to get into because as you said they live and die by the entertainment they provide.

My advice - if you want to get into streaming, just do it! None of those channels began being sustainable day 1, it takes a while to gain traction and popularity. No one ever ends up just walking into roles like this, it takes a ton of hard work and years of working on your craft. Do it for fun, do it consistently, and work hard every single day to try and make your dream a reality.

If you are interested in getting into game development, look for companies you have never heard of before. This seems odd / impossible, but it is the best advice to get into a fun, stress free (well, less stress anyway, there's stress in any job) game development. The company I work for as a developer is not a game development company, they are a hotel chain. Yes, a hotel chain. They wanted to provide games for kids to play as when they stay at the hotel so they hired some talent from local studios (and for whatever reason they hired me too!) and started building up a small studio.

The reason I suggest looking for roles like this is that games are not the sole income for these companies, and they tend to be very hands-off and offer tons of creative freedom to the developers. You still have budgets and deadlines, but for the past two years my schedule has been almost entirely 40 hrs/wk and relatively low stress.

As another example, the company that produces American Girl Dolls, Mattel, had an opening for a flash game developer to make simple kids games on their website. I have no information about what this position ended up looking like, but something tells me this would be low stress, highly creative, and very fun to be a part of.


And now, general life advice (from a 23 year old, so I guess grain of salt): always work towards your goals. Echoing what I said above, work hard every day trying to get where you want to go. It is really easy to come home from work and fool around on the internet or go drinking with friends or just play games or watch sports, but you will get some much personal satisfaction and motivation by actively working towards something that furthers your personal and professional goals. I work 8 hours, go home, and spend a few hours working on a indie game. I do this almost every single day with the goal of eventually being able to support myself as an indie developer. Its not always easy and its not always fun, but it is really important to me and makes me feel like I am always moving forward and never stagnating.

tl;dr: start streaming today, look for jobs in odd places, and work hard to get where you want to go.
Big Nikus
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(03-20-2017, 03:45 PM)
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Just know that you need a lot of discipline if you plan on working from your home. It's not as great as it sounds.

I'm writing a videogame-related book, it's not a secure job and I haven't slept for the last 260 days. Kill me.

No seriously I haven't slept for the last 32 hours, it's 4pm here, and good night.
Dangansona
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(03-20-2017, 03:46 PM)
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I'm hoping to one day be a web developer for a game studio. They have positions for that.
Napalm_Frank
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(03-20-2017, 03:46 PM)
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Sorry you missed the ham it up for the camera while playing videogames train.
keraj37
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(03-20-2017, 03:51 PM)
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You should apply for CEO of Valve.

But seriously, I am programmer in this industry and I must say it is not that bad as you described it - it all depends on company and how you are able to fight for your rights.

Right now I work in Germany in very big company (around 2000 employees) and the conditions are great - no overtime, no stress (unless you don't know what you are doing or you are lazy).
calavera_jo
Junior Member
(03-20-2017, 03:56 PM)
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Originally Posted by Hitlersaurus Christ

Creative director. Good luck getting there.

This position can still be soul-crushing
laxu
Member
(03-20-2017, 03:57 PM)
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Originally Posted by Dangansona

I'm hoping to one day be a web developer for a game studio. They have positions for that.

I think that would be only exciting if you get to do some proper promo websites like the one they have for For Honor utilizing WebGL. Otherwise you'd most likely be stuck with doing quite basic sites. Still, if it gets you closer to the development of a game you like then it could be a good gig and relatively low stress.
Wonko_C
Member
(03-20-2017, 04:01 PM)
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Same dilemma here. I came to the conclusion that if I want to do something gaming related but don't want to get into the games industry or gaming press the only option is to open my own PC Gaming/Virtual Reality Bar. Most businesses in my area just rent consoles on cheap TVs per-hour and call it a day. I want to do something more on the side of high-end experiences, with huge screens, 4K, incredible sound. I can even visualize the building looking like something out of Deus Ex: Human Revolution or Mirror's Edge Catalyst.
Last edited by Wonko_C; 03-20-2017 at 04:03 PM.
Dangansona
Member
(03-20-2017, 04:03 PM)
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Originally Posted by laxu

I think that would be only exciting if you get to do some proper promo websites like the one they have for For Honor utilizing WebGL. Otherwise you'd most likely be stuck with doing quite basic sites. Still, if it gets you closer to the development of a game you like then it could be a good gig and relatively low stress.

Haha yeah that's kind of what I figured. It could also be dope to be in charge of gaming press websites, but I'd imagine that's mostly contract work and not a kept position.
SOLDIER
Member
(03-20-2017, 04:06 PM)
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Originally Posted by kqedequalsvolvo

My limited experience of this stuff is that you are far, far more likely to be successful being self-starting and building a portfolio of work rather than straight up applying for jobs within the industry - particularly when so much of it is based on networking and having connections.

There's certainly no massive harm in taking on the kinda jobs like at the site you linked, but I don't think the cost/benefit is there. I think you're far more likely to be successful through doing reviews and articles in your spare time and keeping them on a blog/dedicated website that showcases a portfolio of your written work - and pitching freelance pieces/article concepts to websites you believe are a good fit for you. For example, say there's someone in the industry who's not unreachable who you think would be interesting to interview, linked to a theme in gaming or related to recent news. Pitch the idea to outlets you think would find it interesting, citing the work of other people on the site which you feel best matches the tone/subject matter. If no-one goes for it, write it anyway. Put it on your blog. Submit it to smaller outlets. Print it and put it in a zine and take it to trade shows and expos - just keep building a body of work. Keep tweeting about it. Did a journalist write about a subject you feel you've covered in a different or interesting way? Let them know.

It may not achieve anything financial immediately (or ever) - but you can be guaranteed that any pitching you do for work is going to be given more consideration with 1. a body of work and 2. a proven track record of being self-starting and dedicated. The additional thing is that, beyond it costing you a chunk of your spare time, is that writing for your own portfolio will teach you pretty quickly whether regularly writing about games is something you're happy doing multiple times a week as opposed to the 'idea' of doing so.

This is a PR example but if it's of any encouragement, I met someone who works for a fairly big publisher who got a job pretty much via meeting someone at an event, getting chatting, becoming informal mates and maintaining a review blog. The review blog didn't make any money or garner much attention in itself, but when they asked 'let's see some work', they had the blog as proof of ability.

Bottom line is that there's often a loop with gaming jobs where they require experience OR working for free, but unless you know people in the industry already, you can't get a foot in the door as you've not managed to gain the experience or can't afford to work for free. So make your own experience in your spare time whilst seeing whether it's something you enjoy doing on the regular.

I actually do have additional experience writing a (mostly) gaming blog and a gaming podcast (I can link both via PM on request). I also edited together a few videos during a brief stint as a video content editor for a failed website.

I enjoyed all those different types of media coverage, and I would like to try making more videos as well. In the end, I'm motivated by money, which is why I'm trying to narrow down the types of fields I should consider going into for the best possible job within my skill set.

Originally Posted by Big Nikus

Just know that you need a lot of discipline if you plan on working from your home. It's not as great as it sounds.

I'm writing a videogame-related book, it's not a secure job and I haven't slept for the last 260 days. Kill me.

No seriously I haven't slept for the last 32 hours, it's 4pm here, and good night.

I had a work at home seasonal job with Amazon customer service.

The customer service part was awful, but being in my pajamas while watching TV made up for it. And I was always on time, focused on the job when needed, etc.

I would especially love being able to avoid commuting, especially because Miami is a hellish Mad Max-esque experience whenever I'm on the expressway.
Blasian Persuasion
Banned
(03-20-2017, 04:08 PM)

Originally Posted by kqedequalsvolvo

Bottom line is that there's often a loop with gaming jobs where they require experience OR working for free, but unless you know people in the industry already, you can't get a foot in the door as you've not managed to gain the experience or can't afford to work for free. So make your own experience in your spare time whilst seeing whether it's something you enjoy doing on the regular.

Mannn, I happened to run into somebody who works at a AAA studio and got him to pass my resume around and I still didn't get shit. I feel like because I ain't shit. I try so hard and still get no where. I feel like I'm doomed to stay living with my mom forever.

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