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Memorabilia
Member
(04-19-2017, 12:58 PM)

Originally Posted by DonMigs85

Based on Anandtech's article Vega is supposed to introduce quite a few changes and enhancements like improved IPC, tiling, different memory access patterns/using onboard memory as a sort of fast virtual cache, and more. It's the biggest change since the transition from VLIW to GCN.
And Polaris was already a decent improvement in efficiency. Just compare the RX 460 to the R7 370, despite the latter's greater sp count and memory bandwidth the 460 often matches or exceeds it.

Do we know yet if Vega tech will filter down into the entire product stack or only be high end while Polaris continues to occupy the mid and low end? I'm mostly curious about Vega's potential to dramatically improve efficiency on smaller GPUs that can fit into ITX cases. Which won't happen anytime soon if AMD decides to continue with Polaris rather than replace it entirely with Vega. My hope is Polaris gets put out to pasture sooner rather than later and we see a Vega based 650/660/670 series asap.
Memorabilia
Member
(04-19-2017, 01:02 PM)

Originally Posted by DonMigs85

Ahem


There are low profile RX 460 cards, and the 550 and 560 will probably get LP variants too

I was specifically talking about a low-profile (LP) iteration. That form factor isn't actually LP, tho it is a shorter PCB that'd be awesome for cube-style cases and definitely a step in the right direction! AMD needs some small FF options.
Last edited by Memorabilia; 04-19-2017 at 01:07 PM.
Renekton
Member
(04-19-2017, 01:04 PM)
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Originally Posted by Memorabilia

Do we know yet if Vega tech will filter down into the entire product stack or only be high end while Polaris continues to occupy the mid and low end? I'm mostly curious about Vega's potential to dramatically improve efficiency on smaller GPUs that can fit into ITX cases. Which won't happen anytime soon if AMD decides to continue with Polaris rather than replace it entirely with Vega. My hope is Polaris gets put out to pasture sooner rather than later and we see a Vega based 650/660/670 series asap.

Both will be likely be replaced by Navi down the road. Navi's tagline is "scalability" which suggests it can be scaled from high-end to low-end.

Navi is also the first architecture designed with full participation from Raja Koduri IINM.
ColdDeckEd
Member
(04-19-2017, 01:13 PM)
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Originally Posted by dogen

It's a lot more than just clocks lol

I know there's some other tweaks but a Rx 470 is not that much faster than an 280x. Much more efficient, sure.
DonMigs85
Member
(04-19-2017, 01:32 PM)
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Originally Posted by ColdDeckEd

I know there's some other tweaks but a Rx 470 is not that much faster than an 280x. Much more efficient, sure.

It's actually quite a bit faster, like comparing a GTX 960 to the 970
Wonder Peter
Junior Member
(04-19-2017, 01:37 PM)
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Is the 580 a good upgrade to substitute my HD 7870? I'll probably won't play at 4K anyway for now...
Marmelade
Member
(04-19-2017, 01:42 PM)

Originally Posted by dr_rus

It's still GCN so no, it won't be something completely new. From what was disclosed so far the biggest performance impacting feature is likely the TBIR mode (as in Maxwell+) but I feel that this will be pretty much irrelevant on an HBM2 powered top end chip. The rest is the usual GCN optimizations which will likely result in <10% gain.

Basically, after how Fiji and Polaris turned out, I prefer to not expect much from Vega.

I worded my answer poorly, obviously it's still GCN and not "something entirely different" but I had never read anything about Vega 10 being Fiji-based except for that one card (MI8, not based on Vega 10) that looks to just be a Nano rebrand
hooch1
Junior Member
(04-19-2017, 01:45 PM)

Originally Posted by Oemenia

Any reason to buy one over the 1060?

If you haven't bought into gsync yet, freesync being cheaper is reason.
Omeganex9999
Member
(04-19-2017, 02:11 PM)
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Originally Posted by Wonder Peter

Is the 580 a good upgrade to substitute my HD 7870? I'll probably won't play at 4K anyway for now...

For [email protected] or [email protected]/High (based on the game), definitely. It's much much faster than a 7870.
ColdDeckEd
Member
(04-19-2017, 03:11 PM)
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Originally Posted by DonMigs85

It's actually quite a bit faster, like comparing a GTX 960 to the 970

The 280x is bit faster than the 960, while the 470 is alittle bit slower than a 970.

If you want to say that 470 is much more efficient, or a better value than the original price of the 7970 then those statements I can agree with. But it's just not that much faster.
dr_rus
Member
(04-19-2017, 03:13 PM)
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AMD Radeon RX 480 can be flashed to RX 580
Haha.

Originally Posted by Marmelade

I worded my answer poorly, obviously it's still GCN and not "something entirely different" but I had never read anything about Vega 10 being Fiji-based except for that one card (MI8, not based on Vega 10) that looks to just be a Nano rebrand

Technically Vega 10 looks like an upgraded Fiji - same number of SPs and CUs, same memory bandwidth, HBM again, etc. So basically it's Fiji but with stuff being improved and enhanced enough for it to be GCN5 instead of 3/4.
Last edited by dr_rus; 04-19-2017 at 03:54 PM.
Corpsepyre
Member
(04-19-2017, 07:24 PM)
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Originally Posted by dr_rus

AMD Radeon RX 480 can be flashed to RX 580
Haha.


Technically Vega 10 looks like an upgraded Fiji - same number of SPs and CUs, same memory bandwidth, HBM again, etc. So basically it's Fiji but with stuff being improved and enhanced enough for it to be GCN5 instead of 3/4.

So....good or not?
dr_rus
Member
(04-19-2017, 07:43 PM)
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Originally Posted by Corpsepyre

So....good or not?

Vega? No one knows but I prefer to expect less.
McStickenstein
Junior Member
(04-19-2017, 07:45 PM)
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Originally Posted by Wonder Peter

Is the 580 a good upgrade to substitute my HD 7870? I'll probably won't play at 4K anyway for now...

I made the upgrade from 7870 for 480 last year, no regrets. Went from struggling at med-high settings for the newest games at 1080p to Ultra 1080p. Huge upgrade. The biggest gain is the 2GB VRAM to 8 GB, but the raw performance increase is great as well.
icecold1983
Banned
(04-20-2017, 02:38 AM)
vega will probably slot somewhere between 1080 and 1080ti
chaosblade
Member
(04-20-2017, 02:47 AM)
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Originally Posted by icecold1983

vega will probably slot somewhere between 1080 and 1080ti

Depends on the card, there will probably be something sub-1080 too. Feels like all we can safely say is "above Polaris," since the 500 series rebrand would have been even more pointless than it already is if Vega was going to compete in that space.
icecold1983
Banned
(04-21-2017, 01:11 AM)
580 v 480 v 1060

sniper elite 4

doom
dr_rus
Member
(04-21-2017, 05:19 AM)
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Gigabyte RX 570 4GB Aorus Review & Benchmark: Power, Thermals, FPS

AMD Radeon RX 580 Linux OpenGL/Vulkan Benchmarks
Last edited by dr_rus; 04-21-2017 at 08:11 AM.
DonMigs85
Member
(04-21-2017, 11:02 AM)
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So dudes, I bought a Gigabyte RX 570 today but it won't produce any video output on my old Core 2 Quad Dell - I'm thinking it's due to legacy BIOS.
I may lend it to my friend since he built an i5-6500 based rig last year but doesn't have a discrete GPU yet, as it'll take me a few months to save enough to build a new Ryzen R5 1600 rig.
DonMigs85
Member
(04-21-2017, 12:08 PM)
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Just an update - got the card working using a DVI cable for some reason and was able to install the driver. Will try HDMI for Freesync later
VillageBC
Member
(04-21-2017, 02:48 PM)
The 570 seems like a decent boost and worthwhile of you are in that product segment. Is where I sit in as a 1080p gamer and with the cdn$. 580/1060 decent cards are all sitting in that $350+ price range for the most part.
icecold1983
Banned
(04-21-2017, 06:37 PM)
tomb raider dx12

580 v 480 v 1060
spyshagg
Should not be allowed to breed
(04-21-2017, 07:35 PM)
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1060 non OC 1848mhz. Damn
icecold1983
Banned
(04-22-2017, 03:18 AM)
the witcher

1060 oc v 580 oc
DonMigs85
Member
(04-25-2017, 08:42 AM)
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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z-Sm...tbByAC7TUcEY-6

Indeed a great affordable card for 1080p, and 4GB VRAM should be ok for at least the next 2-3 years at that resolution methinks.
Ploid 3.0
Member
(04-25-2017, 09:14 AM)
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I saw that earlier, good card for people getting very budget cards. Heck I should have got it but when I moved to Intel CPU before I knew about ryzen (if only I had waited a few more months, but I always wait a few more months, I waited too long) I impulse bought a rx 480. Love the card though, I wish I was brave enough to flash it to red devil 580 for the lower temperatures alone.

My Red Devil rx 480 can already hit 1410 but it get very hot and if I want to keep temps down I gotta blast the fans. I undervolt (-78) and over clocked it to 1360 (from 1330) for now. I've been following that Techpowerup thread for a long time and those flashes get 1411 with very low temperatures and voltage, it seems unreal.

If I had a Rx 580 I would undervolt the heck out of it. They give these cards high stock voltage (480 and it seems 580).
AmyS
Member
(04-26-2017, 09:03 AM)
AMD Announces Radeon Pro Duo (Polaris) - Double Polaris for Content Creation

Back in 2016 AMD launched the Radeon Pro Duo, an interesting take on a semi-pro workstation card. As a dual-GPU Fiji card wasn’t going to be viable for the consumer market, AMD instead focused their attention on developing such a card for the professional content creation market, where the lack of VRAM would be less of an issue and the second GPU more of an asset. The resulting card was best geared for a niche market, but none the less an important one for the company.

Until now, I hadn’t seen any real statistics on how the Radeon Pro Duo was doing in the market or if AMD would follow-up on it with newer products. Now at the 2017 NAB Show we have our answer, as AMD has announced their second Radeon Pro Duo. This time powered by a pair of the company’s Polaris 10 GPUs, the latest Radeon Pro Duo is aimed at roughly the same market as the original, but with all of the improvements that Polaris has brought the consumer market in the past year.

Even though it goes after the same market as the last Pro Duo, the new Polaris-based Pro Duo is a much different card in a number of important ways, virtually all of which have to do with the differences in features and design between the previous Fiji GPU and the newer Polaris 10 GPU. Fiji was a high-end GPU that had to be reined in a bit to fit on a dual GPU card – and even then AMD needed a closed loop liquid cooler – whereas the Polaris 10 GPUs that go into the modern incarnation have a much more workable TDP from the start. Coupled with that, Polaris 10 doesn’t have the fixed VRAM capacity of Fiji, which means AMD can significantly increase the total VRAM. As a result, the new Pro Duo strikes a very different balance than the old card.

By the numbers then, the Polaris-based Radeon Pro Duo is actually slower than the older Fiji version. It has a clockspeed advantage, but this isn’t enough to overcome Fiji’s total stream processor advantage. All told, at peak rates the new Pro duo is rated for 11.45 TFLOPs of FP32, while the Fiji version was rated for 16.38 TFLOPs. In practice however I don’t expect that the gap is quite so large, as Fiji would need to throttle more often, and Polaris enjoys at least a small architectural advantage.

What the new Pro Duo loses in throughput it more than picks up in VRAM. With each Polaris 10 GPU sporting a 256-bit GDDR5 memory bus, AMD has outfit each GPU with 16GB of VRAM, quadrupling their VRAM capacity. AMD’s photos don’t show the bare PCB, but I believe it to be a safe bet that AMD is running 8Gb modules in clamshell mode, meaning the board is truly maxed out. AMD argued that the smaller VRAM capacity of the Fiji based card was not a major liability last year, and while there’s admittedly no reason not to fully equip a Polaris 10 card since the company is back to GDDR5, I do think it’s an important step in making the new card more flexible.

The other big change here is that the TBP has come down significantly, from 350W to 250W. Fiji was powerful, but it was also power-hungry, necessitating the original card’s closed loop liquid cooler. The Polaris Pro Duo, on the other hand, can get away with a simple blower. In fact this is the first time we’ve seen a blower-type dual GPU card from AMD in many years. And though an uncommon choice for a dual GPU card, it makes a great deal of sense given the card’s professional workstation market, as blowers are expected there, and the Radeon WX cards are already similarly equipped.

Full article here: http://www.anandtech.com/show/11294/...ro-duo-polaris

http://www.amd.com/en-us/press-relea...2017apr24.aspx
Rains
Member
(04-26-2017, 09:41 AM)
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Feels like i have been waiting forever for Vega just hope its 1080 and above
llien
Junior Member
(04-26-2017, 09:54 AM)
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Originally Posted by Rains

Feels like i have been waiting forever for Vega just hope its 1080 and above

Given its size of nearly 500 square mm it can NOT not beat 1080, which is 314 mm2.
The question is, how well it fares vs 1080Ti/Titan. (both in 500-ish area)
DonMigs85
Member
(04-26-2017, 10:09 AM)
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Originally Posted by llien

Given its size of nearly 500 square mm it can NOT not beat 1080, which is 314 mm2.
The question is, how well it fares vs 1080Ti/Titan. (both in 500-ish area)

AMD must lose a lot of potential profit on their huge dies, going back to Phenom.

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